12pm means: noon or midnight?

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Anonymous:
Does 12pm mean noon or midnight? I am quite confused about this. Thanks!
Steve
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Robert Lieblich:
[nq:1]Does 12pm mean noon or midnight? I am quite confused about this. Thanks![/nq]
Some people will tell you one thing, Some will tell you the other. Some will give up in despair. The solution is never to use 12 p.m. Use 12 noon or 12 midnight. If you encounter 12 p.m., ask the person using it what it means.
There is the further problem that 12 midnight can belong to either of two days. If you must use it, say something like "12 midnight at the end of Tuesday, March 21." That gives the poor reader a fighting chance.
There's a reason why airline and train schedules don't use 12:00.

Be sure to follow this thread to the end. You'll get a whole bunch of differing opinions from which to choose.

Bob Lieblich
But of course only I am right
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ray o'hara:
[nq:2]Does 12pm mean noon or midnight? I am quite confused about this. Thanks![/nq]
[nq:1]Some people will tell you one thing, Some will tell you the other. Some will give up in despair. The ... a whole bunch of differing opinions from which to choose. Bob Lieblich But of course only I am right[/nq]
It's funny how something so simple can cause so much confusion.
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Robert Lieblich:
[nq:2]Be sure to follow this thread to the end. You'll get a whole bunch of differing opinions from which to choose.[/nq]
[nq:1]It's funny how something so simple can cause so much confusion.[/nq]
Phew! For a moment there I thought you had written "someone so simple .."

Bob Lieblich
Someone so complicated ...
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ray o'hara:
[nq:1] [/nq]
[nq:2]It's funny how something so simple can cause so much confusion.[/nq]
[nq:1]Phew! For a moment there I thought you had written "someone so simple .."[/nq]
Clean your monitor.
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mirage:
[nq:1]Does 12pm mean noon or midnight? I am quite confused about this. Thanks! Steve[/nq]
Good question. You are right to be confused. Some think 12:00pm means noon, some think midnight, some haven't any idea at all.

A couple rules of thumb: First, don't use 12:00pm, say 'noon'. If you must use a number, you can say 12:01 p.m. or 11:59 a.m. and your reader will know you mean noon. Second, if you mean midnight, say 'midnight, Tuesday night' or 'midnight, Tuesday night/Wednesday morning'.
mirage
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ray o'hara:
[nq:1]Does 12pm mean noon or midnight? I am quite confused about this. Thanks! Steve[/nq]
As you can see nobody knows.
AM and PM - What is Noon and Midnight?
AM and PM start immediately after Midnight and Noon (Midday) respectively.

This means that 00:00 AM or 00:00 PM (or 12:00 AM and 12:00 PM) have no meaning.
Every day starts precisely at midnight and AM starts immediately after that point in time e.g. 00:00:01 AM (see also leap seconds)

To avoid confusion timetables, when scheduling around midnight, prefer to use either 23:59 or 00:01 to avoid confusion as to which day is being referred to.
It is after Noon that PM starts e.g. 00:00:01 PM (12:00:01)
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Anonymous:
Thank you all for helpful information. This "12pm" was used by one of our customers in email as a deadline. It did cause problem in business since I thought it's mid-night (end of a day) and prepared documents accordingly. I submitted the documents around 5pm; but later they said it was delayed because what they meant was noon. Fortunately it didn't cause serious consequences. I shall be careful next time. Need to clarify right at the beginning.
Steve
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Raymond S. Wise:
[nq:2]Does 12pm mean noon or midnight? I am quite confused about this. Thanks! Steve[/nq]
[nq:1]As you can see nobody knows. AM and PM - What is Noon and Midnight? AM and PM start immediately ... confusion as to which day is being referred to. It is after Noon that PM starts e.g. 00:00:01 PM (12:00:01)[/nq]
It should be noted, however, that in the case of clocks and watches which show AM and PM, none have any provision for indicating noon and midnight except by using AM and PM there may be exceptions, but if so, they must be rare in the extreme.
As a result, such clocks and watches show midnight as "12:00 AM" and noon as "12:00 PM." I think some people have mentioned exceptions to this, but I doubt if these exceptions included any clocks or watches made within the last thirty years.
As a practical matter when relying on such clocks and watches, then, "12:00 AM" does indeed mean "midnight" and "12:00 PM" does indeed mean "noon."

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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