26 letters; 1 sentence; no repeats

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David Smyth:
Zyxt Qishm V Jug Band wreck/flop.
Zyxt Qishm Job Pad V wreck flung.
Zyxt is the last word in the 12 Volume 414,825 word Oxford English Dictionary and it means "(you) see". (I think). Qishm is an island which is owned by Iran. So the first sentence means ...See a jug band by the name of the Qishm Five (from the Island of Qishm, of course) perform badly. And the second sentence means... See a wreck on a job site called "Job Pad V" flung (maybe into the sea). Yes they are a stretch and the Roman Numeral V for 5 is cheating and Qishm is a foreign word and Zyxt is an obsolete Kentish word.

They say that no one has come up with an intelligable English sentence using all 26 letters of the alphabet only one time each. I do not claim that I have either...or even come close.
However, I have a feeling that it can be done, and I would not be surprised if someone in this group could do it. The sentence should, of course, use no abbreviations or foreign or obsolete words and should make sense to a person with a good vocabulary. I would use the Oxford English Dictionary and a Medical Dictionary and Black's Law Dictionary and any other specialized dictionaries that I could get my hands on. And, of course, don't forget the word CWM.
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Aaron J. Dinkin:
[nq:1]They say that no one has come up with an intelligable English sentence using all 26 letters of the alphabet only one time each. I do not claim that I have either...or even come close.[/nq]
The canonical example, which cheats because it uses a lot of abbreviations, is "Mr. Jock, TV quiz Ph.D., bags few lynx." Another example, which cheats by using initials and proper names, has the benefit of being the most grammatical and intelligible of the batch in my opinion: "J.Q. Schwartz flung D.V. Pike my box." I'm rather partial to one which cheats by using lots of terribly obscure and arguably non-English words: "Veldt jynx grimps waqf zho buck." If you do a Google search on any of these you'll probably find several more with various advantages and disadvantages.
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
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Charles Riggs:
[nq:1]They say that no one has come up with an intelligable English sentence using all 26 letters of the alphabet only one time each. I do not claim that I have either...or even come close.[/nq]
Can you talk continuously for one minute without rehearsing, making sense as you do, being certain you'll never use a word containing the letter a? Saying dog, dog, dog... won't do. No fun in that for anyone.

Here's how:
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Spoiler space
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Count from one to one hundred.

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
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Stewart Gordon:
While it was 3/2/04 4:28 am throughout the UK, David Smyth sprinkled little black dots on a white screen, and they fell thus:
[nq:1]Zyxt Qishm V Jug Band wreck/flop. Zyxt Qishm Job Pad V wreck flung.[/nq]
There are quite a few sentences like that:
Cwm, fjord-bank glyphs vext quiz
Cwm kvutza qoph jynx fled brigs
Vext cwm fly zing jabs Kurd qoph
[nq:1]They say that no one has come up with an intelligable English sentence using all 26 letters of the alphabet only one time each. I do not claim that I have either...or even come close.[/nq]
I don't know about an intellig a ble sentence of this sort, but thanks to Peter Newby there's one that tries to be intellig i ble:

Qwyk glaz'd vox jumps fern ***
Not that many people know what "fern" as an adjective means..

Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
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Maria Conlon:
[nq:1][/nq]
[nq:2]They say that no one has come up with an ... do not claim that I have either...or even come close.[/nq]
[nq:1] I don't know about an intellig a ble sentence of this sort, but thanks to Peter Newby there's one that tries to be intellig i ble: Qwyk glaz'd vox jumps fern *** Not that many people know what "fern" as an adjective means..[/nq]
A comma after "fern" eliminates the need for it to be an adjective.

Maria Conlon
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Ray Heindl:
[nq:1]I don't know about an intellig a ble sentence of this sort, but thanks to Peter Newby there's one that tries to be intellig i ble: Qwyk glaz'd vox jumps fern *** Not that many people know what "fern" as an adjective means..[/nq]
Probably about as many as know what "qwyk" (that's really hard to type) or "vox" mean. In my dialect, the latter should be "VOX".
Ray Heindl
(remove the Xs to reply to: (Email Removed))
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Richard Sabey:
[nq:1]I'm rather partial to one which cheats by using lots of terribly obscure and arguably non-English words: "Veldt jynx grimps waqf zho buck."[/nq]
That one has many more problems than the obscurity of its words: "grimp" is not a transitive verb; a zho is a bovine, so a male zho is a bull, not a buck; worst of all, we have the geographically improbable situation of a jynx (European wryneck bird) of the South African veldt grimping (whatever that is) a Himalayan zho associated with waqf (the donation of Islamic land).

There's also:
"New job: fix Mr. Gluck's hazy TV PDQ"
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Stewart Gordon:
While it was 4/2/04 9:28 pm throughout the UK, Ray Heindl sprinkled little black dots on a white screen, and they fell thus:
[nq:2]Not that many people know what "fern" as an adjective means..[/nq]
[nq:1]Probably about as many as know what "qwyk" (that's really hard to type) or "vox" mean. In my dialect, the latter should be "VOX".[/nq]
OK, so maybe I meant "are able to guess by resemblance to a familiar word".

So, what does VOX stand for in your dialect?
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
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Kevin Wald:
[nq:2]I'm rather partial to one which cheats by using lots of terribly obscure and arguably non-English words: "Veldt jynx grimps waqf zho buck."[/nq]
[nq:1]That one has many more problems than the obscurity of its words:[/nq]
(List of improbabilities deleted.)
How about my favorite (all its words are in the Merriam-Webster 11th Collegiate, and it doesn't rely on headlinish article-dropping):

Dang, cwm qophs vex jib-klutz fry!
While it is not certain that Hebrew letters inscribed in a mountain basin really would bewilder the children of incompetent sailors, it seems to me that, well, they could.
Kevin Wald (Email Removed) > And "XV nymphs beg quick fjord http://www.math.uchicago.edu/~wald > waltz" cheats, but is still nice.
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