A word that means "to state the obvious"

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Todd:
Does anybody know a word that means to "state the obvious." Perhaps a more elegant word than "duh." Thanks. /Todd
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Anonymous:
[nq:1]Does anybody know a word that means to "state the obvious." Perhaps a more elegant word than "duh."[/nq]
And only a tad less insulting.
GFH
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Weatherlawyer:
[nq:1]Does anybody know a word that means to "state the obvious." Perhaps a more elegant word than "duh."[/nq]
Is that a translation from the Welsh sound of disrespect made by placing the tp of th tongue on the top front teeth and making a lower jaw movement to force air in as the tongue is moved?
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Anonymous:
[nq:1]Does anybody know a word that means to "state the obvious." Perhaps a more elegant word than "duh." Thanks. /Todd[/nq]
It is unclear in what way you want to be able to use the word. If as a standalone reply or one-word comment as, presumably, "Duh" would be used there is always "obviously". Obviously. Likewise "manifestly".

More sarcastic: "kinderspiel". The word is not English, even by adoption, but if it's good enough for Bancroft Pons, it should suffice.
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Joachim Pense:
Am 5 Mar 2006 03:02:22 -0800 schrieb (Email Removed):
[nq:2]Does anybody know a word that means to "state the obvious." Perhaps a more elegant word than "duh." Thanks. /Todd[/nq]
...
[nq:1]More sarcastic: "kinderspiel". The word is not English, even by adoption, but if it's good enough for Bancroft Pons, it should suffice.[/nq]
The literal German meaning of "Kinderspiel" is "Child's game", signifying not that something is obvious, but that it is very easy to do.

Which meaning does "kinderspiel" have when you use it in English?

Joachim
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Leslie Danks:
[nq:1]The literal German meaning of "Kinderspiel" is "Child's game", signifying not that something is obvious, but that it is very easy to do. Which meaning does "kinderspiel" have when you use it in English?[/nq]
In English "child's play" is used to mean something that is very easy to do.

Les
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Martin Willett:
[nq:2]The literal German meaning of "Kinderspiel" is "Child's game", signifying ... meaning does "kinderspiel" have when you use it in English?[/nq]
[nq:1]In English "child's play" is used to mean something that is very easy to do.[/nq]
I think it is an excellent suggestion, it is almost always the case that a word imported into the language takes on a narrower meaning than it covers in the original language. Petite simply means small in French whereas in English it means small in a good way, compact, efficient, trim and possibly sexy. Salsa is simply sauce to a Spaniard and could include almost any kind of wet food-like substance and of course in Italian tempo means time whereas in English its meaning is much more narrowly defined.
There's thousands of languages out there to plunder and thousands of meanings searching for a unique word. Let's borrow some words and define them to mean what we need them to mean.
We could all invent a new word everyday. Let's start a new movement dedicated to this idea. It needs a name. Any suggestions?

Martin Willett
http://mwillett.org
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Anonymous:
[nq:2]Does anybody know a word that means to "state the obvious." Perhaps a more elegant word than "duh."[/nq]
[nq:1]And only a tad less insulting. GFH[/nq]
This reply and the others got me thinking. I don't remember ever using the expression "to state the obvious", but I occasionally use the shorter "obviously", but with an apologetic and self-deprecatory intent. I never thought it could be taken as insulting or patronising, but I can see now how it might be taken as such. I'm a non-native user - obviously.. Emotion: smile
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dee:
[nq:1]Does anybody know a word that means to "state the obvious." Perhaps a more elegant word than "duh." Thanks. /Todd[/nq]
'Apparently'.. and probably 'Obviously'...?
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