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Anonymous:
According to what I've read, word "number" is abbreviated "no."

Can this abbreviation be used anywhere to replace "number" (Number of students), or only when talking about a sequence number (Competitor number five)? Can the word be abbreviated also "nr."?

Thanks for help!
I'm personally not familiar with using "nr." but that doesn't mean it isn't ever done. His bib no. was 515 in the race would probably work, although you don't usually use abbreviations in normal prose. Save that for a chart. On the other hand, you can use the pound sign (#): He was #515 in the race.
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Anonymous:
To abbreviate the word ' number' it is with a capital 'N' and followed by a full stop.....i.e...'No.'
Well, Anon, it depends on what you use as your style guide, doesn't it?

Abbreviations are a matter of style, not grammar, which means that there is no "always do" and "never do." The most important thing for style is to be consistent within whichever style you choose to follow. You can use AP, or Chicago, or whatever you follow, including a house style.

The fact that you say "full stop" instead of "period" already tells me that you follow some different styles than I do.

I found two examples online in just moments that advocate for no. for number.
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Anonymous:
It's still a bit unclear to me whether "no." (or some other abbreviation, maybe) can be used to replace number eg. in phrases "Number of messages" and "Serial number". Would you please share your views. I do have a reason for using abbreviations.
Anonymous:
The number sign # (also known as hash) is mostly used for counting or ranking lists (ordinal numbering), especially in names and titles.
If the # is placed behind a number it's called a pound sign in the US (3# of sugar), if precedes the number it's called number sign, other countries use lb. for pound instead
UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Russia and the rest of Europe use N°. If the superscript "o" isn't available then it's written as No. The abbreviation no. is also used.
In Germany the the Abbreviation Nr. for "Nummer" is commonly used.

Some information:

.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_sign
Anonymous:
hi,

I hope the term number must be abbreviated only as "no.". But some people are using the abbreviation without the "dot" at the end.
Anonymous:
In French, the dot depends on the last letter. As the abbreviation of numéro (meaning number) ends with the last letter of the word numéro, we don't use the dot. If the abbreviation was built with the starting letters like nu, in that case we should write "nu." (nu dot).

Another example is boulevard. In English you write blvd but the rigth abbreviation is boul. in French. With the dot to follow the previous rule.

It doesn't apply to English. Even in French, I can't say if this rule is always true as in french, no rule always is. Emotion: smile

Pierre
AnonymousIt's still a bit unclear to me whether "no." (or some other abbreviation, maybe) can be used to replace number eg. in phrases "Number of messages" and "Serial number". Would you please share your views. I do have a reason for using abbreviations.
no.,
1. north.
2. northern.
3. number.
Also, No.
(Random House Unabridged Dictionary)

Webster's disciples think both no. and No. are correct. I wouldn't omit the full stop/period after no. even if I were a Brit as that might cause confusion in some contexts. I would not use no./No. in "number of messages" or any other similar expressions. No. looks all right when it is used with a numeral: No. 5. I would consider "serial number" a borderline case but would probably refrain from using the abbreviation in that context. As GG says, this is a matter of style rather than grammar.

CB
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