Abbreviation of Ounces

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Klaus Hoelscher:
Good morning!
I wonder what the correct abbreviation for ounces is:

a) 2.7 oz
b) 2.7 ozs
c) 2.7 ozs.
Thanks for your thoughts...
Klaus
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Carmen L. Abruzzi:
[nq:1]Good morning![/nq]
Good Morning! and Happy Labor Day (celebrated)!
[nq:1]I wonder what the correct abbreviation for ounces is: a) 2.7 oz b) 2.7 ozs c) 2.7 ozs.[/nq]
No, none are right. There's no "2.7" involved in abbreviating "ounces". )
Other than that, it is not usual to add the "s" to the end of the "oz" .
[nq:1]Thanks for your thoughts... Klaus[/nq]
I wanna pony, and I been a good boy.
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Bob Cunningham:
[nq:1]I wonder what the correct abbreviation for ounces is: a) 2.7 oz b) 2.7 ozs c) 2.7 ozs.[/nq]
Your question involves two things: (1) Is the "s" used with the abbreviation to show plural number, and (2) Is there a period (point? dot? stop?) after the abbreviation?

To the first of them, the New Shorter Oxford implies the answer is no, with the definition
oz. = ounce(s)
As for the period after the abbreviation, we've been told that British practice is to not use it, but the above example from a British dictionary seems to contradict that information.
As part of my rebellion against certain American punctuation rules that I greatly dislike, I avoid periods wherever possible. After abbreviations I think they introduce somewhat unsightly clutter and perform no essential function. So I would write
2.7 fl oz

but I would expect an American style guides to say to write
2.7 fl. oz.
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Ray Heindl:
[nq:1]As for the period after the abbreviation, we've been told that British practice is to not use it, but the above example from a British dictionary seems to contradict that information.[/nq]
My understanding, such as it is, of the UKan full-stop-after- abbreviations policy is that the period is omitted only when the abbreviation ends with the last letter of the word; e.g., "Mr" for Mister, "Dr" for Doctor. By that logic "oz." would be correct, since Z is not the last letter of "ounce".

Ray Heindl
(remove the Xs to reply)
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Mike Lyle:
[nq:2]As for the period after the abbreviation, we've been told ... example from a British dictionary seems to contradict that information.[/nq]
[nq:1]My understanding, such as it is, of the UKan full-stop-after- abbreviations policy is that the period is omitted only when ... for Mister, "Dr" for Doctor. By that logic "oz." would be correct,since Z is not the last letter of "ounce".[/nq]
Yes, but it replaces the full stop. In fact, I think it was invented before the full stop became the rule. My understanding is that the z isn't really a z, but a flourish which happened to look rather zeddish in manuscript.

Mike.
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eromlignod:
I think you're right. It's one of the apothecaries' symbols along with that for drams and scruples. See them here:
http://www.lib.umich.edu/tcp/docs/dox/medical.html

They may seem archaic, but I remember as a child having a bottle of prescription cough syrup that had symbols like this molded into the glass bottle. This was in the late Sixties.
Don
Kansas City
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Mike Lyle:
[nq:2]Yes, but it replaces the full stop. In fact, I ... a flourish which happened to look rather zeddish in manuscript.[/nq]
[nq:1]I think you're right. It's one of the apothecaries' symbols along with that for drams and scruples. See them here: ... of prescription cough syrup that had symbols like this molded into the glass bottle. This was in the late Sixties.[/nq]
I liked those meticulous units, the handful, the half-handful, and the little handful!

Mike.
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Bob Cunningham:
[nq:2]As for the period after the abbreviation, we've been told ... example from a British dictionary seems to contradict that information.[/nq]
[nq:1]My understanding, such as it is, of the UKan full-stop-after- abbreviations policy is that the period is omitted only when ... Mister, "Dr" for Doctor. By that logic "oz." would be correct, since Z is not the last letter of "ounce".[/nq]
But isn't there something about mensuration units not being abbreviations but symbols, so they don't take the full stop?
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Paul Wolff:
[nq:2]My understanding, such as it is, of the UKan full-stop-after- ... correct, since Z is not the last letter of "ounce".[/nq]
[nq:1]But isn't there something about mensuration units not being abbreviations but symbols, so they don't take the full stop?[/nq]
Having proudly recalled my Eng. Lit. syllabus from 1959 in another thread, I'm brought crashing down to earth by a total lack of recall of the subject matter that was handled under mensuration in the maths books. Measurement of some kind, but what were the units you speak of? Common-or-garden "in" and "cm"? If so, you are probably right, as they are defined by agreement among the powers that be, and their having started out as abbreviations is not decisive. Trig functions aren't dotted either.

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
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