Abbreviations used in footnotes

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Mike Lepore:
Does anyone have a glossary of abbreviations I keep seeing in book footnotes? I know Ibid. means "in the same place". What is q.v. ? What is cf. ? What others are there? Thank you for your time.
Mike Lepore in New York
email lepore delete the 5 at bestweb dot net
http://www.crimsonbird.com /
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Martin Ambuhl:
[nq:1]Does anyone have a glossary of abbreviations I keep seeing in book footnotes?[/nq]
Many dictionaries have these. Check yours.
[nq:1]I know Ibid. means "in the same place". What is q.v. ?[/nq]
"quod vide" = "which see", directs the reader to another place (usually in the same text) for more information.
[nq:1]What is cf. ?[/nq]
"confer" (L) = "compare"
[nq:1]What others are there?[/nq]
here are some often seen:
anon. = anonymous
ca., c. (circa) = about a given date
ch., chs. - chapter(s)
ed. = edited by > edition
et al. (et alii) = and others
j., ff. = and the following page(s)
l., ll. = line(s)
loc. cit. (loco citato) = in the place cited
MS, MSS = manuscript(s)
n.d. = no date given
n. p. = no place of publication given
p., pp. = page(s)
passim = here and there
rev. = revised
trans., tr. = translated bt
vide = see.
vol., vols. = volume(s)
[nq:1]Thank you for your time. Mike Lepore in New York[/nq]
Matin Ambuhl in Brooklyn, whose rape by Manhattan will be avenged
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Mike Lyle:
[nq:1]Does anyone have a glossary of abbreviations I keep seeing in book footnotes? I know Ibid. means "in the same place". What is q.v. ? What is cf. ? What others are there? Thank you for your time.[/nq]
You ought to have a one-volume dictionary on your desk: there are plenty to choose from. Go to a bookshop and browse to see which one you like best. Quality names include Oxford and Collins.

Mike.
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Bob Cunningham:
[nq:2]Does anyone have a glossary of abbreviations I keep seeing ... ? What others are there? Thank you for your time.[/nq]
[nq:1]You ought to have a one-volume dictionary on your desk: there are plenty to choose from. Go to a bookshop and browse to see which one you like best. Quality names include Oxford and Collins.[/nq]
Years ago people used to use books. Nowadays, if it ain't on the Web, fuhgiddit. Google (
search?hl=en ) knows a lot about abbreviations. You can search him with, like, (all of the words) "abbreviations ibid cf" and get beaucoup hits.

One that has "q.v.", "cf." and "ibid", among lots of other things, is
http://www.carleton.ca/~karmstro/term/MLAHB6 0.htm
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Mark Brader:
[nq:1]Many dictionaries have these. Check yours.[/nq]
Hey :-), good idea!
[nq:1]j., ff. = and the following page(s)[/nq]
Typo; that's f, not j. Also seen sometimes with a page number is n., meaning a footnote on that page.
[nq:1]loc. cit. (loco citato) = in the place cited[/nq]
More often seen is op.cit. (opere citato) = in the work cited. This means to look for a previous footnote citing the same author, and the relevant title and publication details will be there.
[nq:1]vol., vols. = volume(s)[/nq]
With periodicals, sometimes the volume and issue number are written as plain numbers, the volume in boldface and the issue in regular type. Typically the year is then given in parentheses, but the rest of the issue date is omitted: it's assumed that you'll be looking in library volumes bound by years.
[nq:1]Matin Ambuhl[/nq]
(Grin)
[nq:1]in Brooklyn, whose rape by Manhattan will be avenged[/nq]
Will that be by the Dodgers or the Americans?

Mark Brader > "...the government is simply a bunch of people we've Toronto > hired to protect ourselves from thieves and murderers (Email Removed) > and rapists and other governments..." Bill Stewart

My text in this article is in the public domain.
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