1 2
Anonymous:
In what cases the gerund/infinitive form should be used with the verb admit ?

She admitted (to make) /making a mistake.
The new law was generally admitted to be (being) difficult to enforce.

thanx in advance,

Srdjee
"Admit" is a gerund taker and the gerund can connote the action happened prior to "admit". So "she admitted making a mistake". When "admit" is used in a passive form, the construct should be "be admitted to have done". So "the new law is admitted to have been difficult to enforce".

paco
Senior Member4,095
Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
Admit to is an idiom. Technically it consists of the intransitive verb admit and the preposition to. The idiomatic combination admit to means acknowledge.

She admitted to making a mistake means She acknowledged making a mistake. Technically, making is the gerund object of the preposition to, and the whole phrase to making a mistake describes in what way she admitted.

I'm not sure that the second sentence works as written. One could say

The difficulty of enforcing the new law was generally admitted to [acknowledged].

Or

The new law was generally recognized as being difficult to enforce.
Full Member350
Your subject line says "admit to or admit -ing". There is a third choice: "admit to -ing".

Use "admit to -ing". You can also use "admit -ing". Do not use "admit to" followed by a verb without the -ing except in the passive usage (was admitted to be difficult).

She admitted to making a mistake.
She admitted making a mistake.

(She admitted to make a mistake is wrong.)

CJ
Veteran Member53,358
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
paco2004"Admit" is a gerund taker and the gerund can connote the action happened prior to "admit". So "she admitted making a mistake". When "admit" is used in a passive form, the construct should be "be admitted to have done". So "the new law is admitted to have been difficult to enforce".paco
I didn't understand about this gerund taker thing. Raymond Murphy says that this verb, when followed by another one, takes the ing form. Wikidictionary also says that this verb is a catenative verb followed by a gerund. So can anyone tell me when I use admit + to infinitive? What gerund taker means? Are there another verbs in the same situation?
Junior Member72
Mikaelgerund taker
A word that is normally followed by a gerund (-ing verb).
MikaelRaymond Murphy says that this verb, when followed by another one, takes the ing form.
So Raymond Murphy is saying that this verb is "a gerund taker".
MikaelWikidictionary also says that this verb is a catenative verb followed by a gerund.
So this dictionary is also saying that this verb is "a gerund taker".

All you have here is three different ways of saying the same thing.
MikaelSo can anyone tell me when I use admit + to infinitive?
If you go back through this thread again, carefully, you will see that this question has already been answered, and the answer is "Never".

He admits to go. Wrong.
They admit to find it. Wrong.
She admitted to be seen there. Wrong.

CJ
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
CalifJimHe admits to go. Wrong.
They admit to find it. Wrong.
She admitted to be seen there. Wrong.
That's what I thought until seeing this sentence: The appointment is now generally admitted to have been a mistake.

Shouldn't that be admitted to having been?

That sentece I got from the Oxford Dictionary.
I wrote above:

Do not use "admit to" followed by a verb without the -ing except in the passive usage (was admitted to be difficult).

I neglected to add this underlined phrase after "Never" when I restated the rule again for you.

This means that this, with its passive "is admitted", is correct:

The appointment is now generally admitted to have been a mistake.

CJ
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
CalifJimShe admitted to making a mistake.
She admitted making a mistake.
Do those sentences have the same meaning or you used them just to give a example?

Can I say:

She admits to being strict with her children.
She admits being strict with her children.

He admitted to all his mistakes.
He admitted all his mistakes

Do they have the same meaning?
Are they gramatically correct?
Show more
Live chat
Registered users can join here