Adverb and verb position

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A.B.:
Hello,
I have a question about the correct position of the adverb in a sentence, it seems to me that generally the adverb precedes the verb. For example,
I would say:
"He typically eats pankakes" rather than "He eats typically pankakes" (adverb before the verb)
"He is typically having pankakes" rather than "He is having typically pankakes" but I'd be tempted to say "He typically is having pankakes" (adverb before the verb... before the auxilliary? )

"The weather is typically good" rather than "The weather typically is good" (here "typically" modifies the adjective good rather than the verb is so it's ok if it's after)
"He typically is hungry" rather than "He is typically hungry"... now here's the point where people told me I was wrong. Am I ? Am I wrong about the common usage, the theoretically correct wording or both ?

Thanks
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Athel Cornish-Bowden:
[nq:1]I have a question about the correct position of the adverb in a sentence, it seems to me that generally the adverb precedes the verb. For example, I would say: "He typically eats pankakes" rather than "He eats typically pankakes" (adverb before the verb)[/nq]
In all your example the suitability of the word "typically" ranges from just about acceptable to plain weird, and that makes it more difficult to address your main point.
He often eats pancakes
is entirely natural, whereas
He eats often pancakes
is not English. However,
He eats pancakes often
would be OK, though perhaps a little less natural than the first one.
[nq:1]"He is typically having pankakes" rather than "He is having typically pankakes" but I'd be tempted to say "He typically is having pankakes" (adverb before the verb... before the auxilliary? )[/nq]
I can't easily imagine wanting to say this at all, so I'm not sure how I'd say it if I did. Maybe
He usually has pancakes
[nq:1]"The weather is typically good" rather than "The weather typically is good" (here "typically" modifies the adjective good rather than the verb is so it's ok if it's after)[/nq]
Here "typically" is just about acceptable, and either of your two forms could be used.
[nq:1]"He typically is hungry" rather than "He is typically hungry"...[/nq]
The second seems to me impossible, though it would be OK with "usually". The first is more or less OK.
[nq:1]now here's the point where people told me I was wrong. Am I ? Am I wrong about the common usage,[/nq]
See above.
[nq:1]the theoretically correct wording or both ?[/nq]
There is no "theoretically correct wording".

athel
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Odysseus:
[nq:2]"He typically is hungry" rather than "He is typically hungry"...[/nq]
[nq:1]The second seems to me impossible, though it would be OK with "usually". The first is more or less OK.[/nq]
I wouldn't have any problem with the second in a context where hunger is characteristic of a category to which "he" belongs. I can't think of a good example offhand, and such circumstances must be pretty rare, but I think "impossible" is overstating the case.

Odysseus
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tony cooper:
[nq:2]The second seems to me impossible, though it would be OK with "usually". The first is more or less OK.[/nq]
[nq:1]I wouldn't have any problem with the second in a context where hunger is characteristic of a category to which "he" belongs. I can't think of a good example offhand, and such circumstances must be pretty rare, but I think "impossible" is overstating the case.[/nq]
Any child in Darfur has the certain characteristics: he is typically hungry, diseased, and living in unsanitary conditions.

The condition of a child in Darfur can be predicted. He typically is hungry, diseased, and living in unsanitary conditions.

Not the best sentences, but they use both examples.

Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
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John Dean:
[nq:1]Hello, I have a question about the correct position of the adverb in a sentence, it seems to me that generally the adverb precedes the verb.[/nq]
There are many sentences in English used to show how the position of 'only' may significantly alter the meaning. Adverbs may appear anywhere but be cautious about how they affect the meaning.
The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.
Now put 'typically' in each possible position and see how often it makes sense and how it usually makes a different sense each time.

John Dean
Oxford
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John Varela:
[nq:1]Adverbs may appear anywhere but be cautious about how they affect themeaning.[/nq]
Just the other day my wife asked me why "So I am" and "So am I" have different meanings. I had no idea. All I could say was, "Syntax."

Let's add that "I am so!" and "Am I so?" also have different meanings, but "I so am" and "Am so I" are nonsense.
Using a different verb, "So I can?", "So can I", and "I can so!" make sense, but the other permutations, "I so can", "Can I so", and "Can so I" don't.

So it goes.

John Varela
Trade NEW lamps for OLD for email.
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heron stone:
[nq:1]Using a different verb, "So I can?", "So can I", and "I can so!" make sense, but the other permutations, "I so can", "Can I so", and "Can so I" don't.[/nq]
.well, actually, if you listen to california teens you so can hear them saying stuff like, "i so can
like that..."

unDO email address

Nature, heron stone to be commanded, http://gendo.net must be obeyed. mailto:(Email Removed)
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John Dean:
[nq:2]Using a different verb, "So I can?", "So can I", ... so can", "Can I so", and "Can so I" don't.[/nq]
[nq:1].well, actually, if you listen to california teens you so can hear them saying stuff like, "i so can like that..."[/nq]
Uh huh. And if you spent a lazy afternoon in a Galway pub, you wouldn't be surprised to hear constructions like "Can I so?"

John Dean
Oxford
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John Dean:
[nq:2]Adverbs may appear anywhere but be cautious about how they affect the meaning.[/nq]
[nq:1]Just the other day my wife asked me why "So I am" and "So am I" have different meanings. I had no idea. All I could say was, "Syntax."[/nq]
Does she worry about the difference between "Mary asked John" and "John asked Mary"?

John Dean
Oxford
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