All the best for New Years.

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Freddy:
Christmas, Easter, Queens Birthday, Thanksgiving - all correctly singular. So why do I so Often hear 'New Years'.
Many times I have asked users whether they intend this as a possessive, or as a plural. However it appears to me that those who add the 's' have never heard of a possessive, or a plural, so all I get is a blank stare.
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sand:
[nq:1]Christmas, Easter, Queens Birthday, Thanksgiving - all correctly singular. So why do I so Often hear 'New Years'. Many times ... add the 's' have never heard of a possessive, or a plural, so all I get is a blank stare.[/nq]
It may be a short version of New Year's day.
S&
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Ross Howard:
[nq:1]Christmas, Easter, Queens Birthday, Thanksgiving - all correctly singular. So why do I so Often hear 'New Years'. Many times ... add the 's' have never heard of a possessive, or a plural, so all I get is a blank stare.[/nq]
New Year's (Eve).

Ross Howard
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Freddy:
[nq:2]Christmas, Easter, Queens Birthday, Thanksgiving - all correctlysingular. So why ... a plural, so all I get is a blank stare.[/nq]
[nq:1]It may be a short version of New Year's day. S&[/nq]
So what would 'I was away for a few days over New Years mean'? It is often heard.
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Raymond S. Wise:
[nq:1]singular. or never[/nq]
[nq:2]It may be a short version of New Year's day. S&[/nq]
[nq:1]So what would 'I was away for a few days over New Years mean'? It is often heard.[/nq]
My guess is that it derives from something like "the New Year's holiday break" New Year's Day is a legal holiday and New Year's Eve is considered to be a sort of holiday (in the same way that Christmas Eve is considered to be a sort of holiday, especially by those who open presents on that day instead of on Christmas Day). And here in the US, anyway, when New Year's Day falls on a Thursday or on a Tuesday, you could expect a lot of those people who could manage to do so to arrange to have a "four-day weekend."

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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Robert Lieblich:
[nq:1]singular. or never[/nq]
[nq:2]It may be a short version of New Year's day. S&[/nq]
[nq:1]So what would 'I was away for a few days over New Years mean'? It is often heard.[/nq]
It means the period in which the holiday falls, including the date itself. "Over" is the key to the phrase.
Are you a native speaker of English?

Bob Lieblich
Happy Military Band Day (March Forth)
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Freddy:
To Bob
Yes I am a native speaker of English. I say that I am going away for New Year, or over New Year, just as I would say Easter and not Easters. So is New Years possessive, (New Year's) or plural??
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Robert Lieblich:
(posting order AUE-ed)
[nq:1]often[/nq]
[nq:2]It means the period in which the holiday falls, including ... to the phrase. Are you a native speaker of English?[/nq]
[nq:1]To Bob Yes I am a native speaker of English. I say that I am going away for New Year, or over New Year, just as I would say Easter and not Easters. So is New Years possessive, (New Year's) or plural??[/nq]
No offense meant. Sometimes we have to adjust the answer to the writer's level of knowledge. I didn't want to load this up with a lot of added detail if you already knew most of it. There's too much as is.
I fear there's no one good answer to your question, because we're dealing with idiom, and idiom doesn't have to be logical. (Consider "I could care less.") If logic applied, the day would be either "New Year's Day" (the delay belonging to the new year) or "New Year day" (same result with attributive noun instead of adjective; compare "Christmas Day"). In real life you can find both "New Year's" and "New Years" (even though the latter is, strictly speaking, a plural form), with "Day" following sometimes and sometimes not. The form with apostrophe is technically "correct," but both forms are extremely common.
I ran a google search for "new year's" and "new years." In my experience, google differentiates forms with and without hyphen, and both versions got huge totals: about 2.7 million with apostrophe and about 1.9 million without. So I'd have to say that both are idiomatic. Use whichever makes you content.
What I would recommend against is "New Year" singular when used attributively. Again, google is instructive. Here are some results:
"New Year's Day" 640,000
"New Years Day" 192,000
When I tried "New Year Day" google insisted on giving me the totals for "New Year's Day" as well. The result was about 934,000. If you subtract "New Year's Day you wind up with 274,000, but I'm not sure that's accurate. People mostly don't say "New Year Day" or use "New Year" in attributive contexts. Of course it's "Happy New Year" (singular), but that's a reference to the coming year, not the holiday.
Anyway, the safe bet is to write "New Year's Day" and say it with the final "s" as well. When you're speaking, no one will know whether there's an apostrophe in there or not, of course. Phrases like "over New Year" and "New Year Day" are, to me, a case of overcorrecting. The possessive form is just as correct, and it's what people predominantly write and say. The singular is unidiomatic. You yourself seem to have some doubts about it.

I hope this covers it.

Bob Lieblich
Happy Easters
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Steve Hayes:
[nq:1]Christmas, Easter, Queens Birthday, Thanksgiving - all correctly singular. So why do I so Often hear 'New Years'. Many times ... add the 's' have never heard of a possessive, or a plural, so all I get is a blank stare.[/nq]
Perhaps they mean "New Year's Day".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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