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Anonymous:
When you were told "I love you." from someone. To show that the feeling is mutual, is it appropriate to use "Me too." as an answer?

I was told not to use it, and say "I love you too." instead.
But someone insists that it is not only okay but also among the popular answer used by native speakers in both England and the United States.

I guess it is related somehow to the popular argument of whether or not to use "me too" as an answer to "Nice to meet you."

Your inputs are greatly appreciated.

SS
Hi,

When you were told "I love you." from someone. To show that the feeling is mutual, is it appropriate to use "Me too." as an answer? No.

If Tom says 'I love you' to Mary, what he is saying means that 'Tom loves Mary'. If Mary says 'Me, too', what she is saying is that 'Mary loves Mary'. Obviously, that's not what she means.

I was told not to use it, and say "I love you too." instead. You were given good advice. An extra bonus here is that the person gets to hear the word 'love' come from your mouth, which is always a nice thing to hear.


But someone insists that it is not only okay but also among the popular answer used by native speakers in both England and the United States. Yes, some people say it, but only people who do not love language and grammar. Personally, I could not love someone who does not love language and grammar, and I am sure that you feel the same way.Emotion: big smile Emotion: wink

I guess it is related somehow to the popular argument of whether or not to use "me too" as an answer to "Nice to meet you." 'Me too' is completely inappropriate as a response here.


Best wishes, Clive

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Another possibility could be:

"I love you."
"And I you."


It should be an ellipsis, where "love" is understood.
I'm quite sure I heard it once.
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If my memory serves me correctly, I think there was an episode regarding this issue in Seinfeld.

Seinfeld said 'I love you' to his girlfriend, and the girlfriend simply says 'me too', and in the show, it's thought of as the girlfriend not feeling the same way, i.e. she doesn't love him, or that the emotional intensity is low, or that she just wants to pass it by (not fully accept it or acknowledge what she has heard).

The saying 'I love you' is a very important thing to say to someone, especially the first time.. it's a big deal to say this out aloud. But if the other person simply says 'me too', then that's not being appreciative of this fact. To properly and equally convey the fact the recipient feels the same way, the proper thing to say is 'I love you too', because it is more sincere and there's the word 'love' in it, which is very important. So to summarize, the idea is to equally give back, so to speak, and to make it very clear that the other person loves him/her too.

... the preceding was from a non-gramatical viewpoint.
Full Member158
I was using anonymous account since I had a trouble logging in for some reason.

Thank you for your replies Clive and Mkyol.
You two helped me confirm my original thought.

As for the reply to "Nice to meet you!", I've personally never used "Me too!". If anything, in the situation that was rather casual, I have used "You too." before.
But, I always try to say "Nice to meet you too.".

Needless to say "Me too." is not correct. But, what is your grammatical point of view for "You too."?
I've heard people of various status use it all the time.

SS
New Member45
Hi,

Needless to say "Me too." is not correct. But, what is your grammatical point of view for "You too."?
I've heard people of various status use it all the time.


It's grammatical, in the sense that it can be seen as an abbreviation of 'It's nice to meet you, too'.

It is, however, fairly informal. I probably wouldn't say it as a reply when greeted at the start of a job interview, for example.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thanks Clive for the quick reply.
I also have to thank Tanit for the input earlier. I just missed your reply when I first checked this thread.

SS
Welcome, SS.

I copy here a comment from BBCLearningEnglish .

We can think of lots of other examples if we can think of the example of love and forgetting, you may hear in a film, for example, “I will always love you.” And the person who’s listening may say “and I you.” What they mean is, “and I will always love you.
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Anonymous:
"Me too" is simply wrong, it means you agree and also love the same person, (yourself). "I love you too" is correct as it specifies who you love.
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