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Anonymous:
when somebody asks, "Would you mind opening the window?"

Do you use "Yes" when you answer as in the next sentence?

"Yes. I'm sorry because I've caught a cold."

To me it sounds awkward.
This is a funny one because no matter whether you start with yes or no, it sounds like you are happy to open the window.

Would you mind opening the window?

No, I'll do it for you right now.

Yes, I'll open the window.

To say that you don't want to open the window it is clearer to avoid either yes or no and just say something along the lines of "I'd rather not as I've caught a cold. sorry." or "Would you mind if I didn't? I have a cold, you see".

Aren't we strange!
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Or: "No, not at all!" (for "yes, I'll open the window").

Requests that begin "Would you mind..." seem to be almost impossible to refuse, even if you do have a cold.

MrP
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Anonymouswhen somebody asks, "Would you mind opening the window?"

Do you use "Yes" when you answer as in the next sentence?

"Yes. I'm sorry because I've caught a cold."

To me it sounds awkward.

"No, not at all" is probably the most common reply. If you have a problem with a window being opened at a certain moment, say "Do you mind if we keep it closed as I...".
Senior Member3,149
Anonymous:
Thank you for your answer. Then, if you say, "I'm sorry I can't.I caught a bad cold." to the question "Would you mind opening the window?"

Is it ok?
Hello Anon

It sounds a little odd.

"I can't", in this context, suggests an inability to open the window, rather than an unwillingness. "I'd rather not" would be more appropriate.

And here you would say "I have a cold" (describing a state), rather than "I caught a cold" (describing an event).

So perhaps:

"I'm sorry, I'd rather not, if you don't mind – I have a bad cold."

(It's best to stress the fact that your cold is bad, even if it isn't.)

MrP
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I would say "Sure, no problem." Sure is the same as yes or yeah (yeah is the slang for yes), so I would say "Yeah, no problem." This way you answer the question (yes/no) and you also make it clear that you are doing it willfully and you do not mind doing it.
New Member41
Anonymous:
is it do you mind TO OPEN ...

or

do you mind opening....

im not a native speaker and this little issue keeps bothering me in every test i've taken such as toeic and toefl...

does anyone know which one is correct and what's the difference?

thanks a lot!
Anonymousis it do you mind TO OPEN ...
or

do you mind opening..
Hi,

The first one doesn't work.

As far as I know (but I'm open to corrections if what I write is not natural Emotion: smile), you need either "Do you mind opening the window" (I'm asking you to open it) or "Do you mind if I open the window?"/"Do you mind my opening the window" (I'm politely asking if you have any objections, but I'll open it).

PS: Next time please open a new thread instead of posting in a very old one.
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