Anonymous:
A. I was the top-performer in many of the trainings I attended in the past.
B. I was the top-performer in many of the trainings I've attended in the past.

Which of the sentences above is correct?
If they are both correct, what is the difference?
If I used "most" instead of "many", what would be the difference?
AnonymousA. I was the top-performer in many of the trainings I attended in the past.B. I was the top-performer in many of the trainings I've attended in the past.Which of the sentences above is correct?If they are both correct, what is the difference?If I used "most" instead of "many", what would be the difference?
You're focusing on the wrong thing. What stands out most here is that there is no word trainings, so both are wrong.

most means, roughly, more than 50%.

I was the top performer in most of the training courses I attended.

CJ
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Anonymous:
I'm really thankful of your response.
CalifJimI was the top performer in most of the training courses I attended.
Is it incorrect to add "in the past" at the end of the sentence here? I understand the phrase usually goes with the present perfect,but can it also be used with the simple past?

Why is it incorrect to use the present perfect in the sentence below, aside from the tense-matching reason? Is it ungrammatical? or illogical?

I was the top performer in most of the training courses I 've attended (in the past).
AnonymousIs it incorrect to add "in the past" at the end of the sentence here?
No. It's just redundant. The -ed ending on attended already means "in the past".
AnonymousWhy is it incorrect to use the present perfect in the sentence below
It's not incorrect. I just happen to prefer the simple past in that sentence.

CJ
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Anonymous:
Sorry for my delayed reply, but thank you very much for your response.
CalifJimIt's not incorrect. I just happen to prefer the simple past in that sentence.
I was the top performer in most of the technical trainings I attended.
I was the top performer in most of the technical trainings I've attended.

Since both are correct, is there any difference between them?

I understand that in the second one above, it suggest that the action was done in an unspecified time in the past. Aside from that, does the present perfect above suggest anything else like the "attending" done "so far" as of th present?

Or does it suggest the "attending" might continue in the future?
AnonymousI was the top performer in most of the technical trainings I attended.
I was the top performer in most of the technical trainings I've attended.

Since both are correct
No. I've already told you they are wrong because there is no word trainings.
Anonymousin the second one above, it suggests that the action was done in an unspecified time in the past
True.
Anonymousdoes the present perfect above suggest anything else like the "attending" done "so far"
Yes. That's correct.

CJ
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Anonymous:
I think there's a diference in meaning: simple past has no connection with the present, and present perfect is not that far, it "touches" the present time, but both happened sometime ago. Am I right?

Thanks,

Lilian
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