Are "on the basis of" and "based on" interchangeable?

Are these sentences okay?

1. He was hired on the basis of his experience.
2. He was hired based on his experience.
3. The plan was decided on the basis of our budget.
4. The plan was decided based on our budget.
5. Stop discrimination on the basis of sex.
6. Stop discrimination based on sex.
Full Member415
SnappyAre "on the basis of" and "based on" interchangeable?

Are these sentences okay?

1. He was hired on the basis of his experience.
2. He was hired based on his experience.
3. The plan was decided on the basis of our budget.
4. The plan was decided based on our budget.
5. Stop discrimination on the basis of sex.
6. Stop discrimination based on sex.

Why I asked this question is that a Japanese website explains that "based on" and "on the basis of" are different. According to the website,
Grammatically incorrect: Based on the Landau theory, the magnetic susceptibility is investigated.
Grammatically correct: On the basis of the Landau theory, the magnetic susceptibility is investigated.
The site explains that "based on" must be used in adjectival phrases (which I don't understand very well). The site says the following sentence is correct because "treatment based on" is an adjectival phrase.

We give a treatment based on the Landau theory.

The explanation, however, is made by a non-native speaker of English. Therefore, I would like to ask native speakers' opinion. I'm happy if you can tell me which sentences sound strange with or without gramatical explanation.
.
I disagree with the site's explanation, though it may be based on an earlier prescription. 'Based on' is now often used as an adverbial; the dangers are that the participle is open to dangling and that it can often sound awkward; the result is that the adjective is the safer and commoner choice. Here's how some of your sentences can be improved:

1. He was hired on the basis of his experience.
2. We hired him based on his experience.
3. The plan was decided on the basis of our budget.
4. The decision on the plan was based on our budget.
5. Stop discrimination on the basis of sex.
6. Stop discrimination based on sex.
.
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Mister Micawber.

I disagree with the site's explanation, though it may be based on an earlier prescription. 'Based on' is now often used as an adverbial; the dangers are that the participle is open to dangling and that it can often sound awkward; the result is that the adjective is the safer and commoner choice. Here's how some of your sentences can be improved:

1. He was hired on the basis of his experience.
2. We hired him based on his experience.
3. The plan was decided on the basis of our budget.
4. The decision on the plan was based on our budget.
5. Stop discrimination on the basis of sex.
6. Stop discrimination based on sex.

.

Thank you for your quick and clear answer as usual.

Anonymous:
I would still regard "We hired him based on his experience" as ungrammatical.
Anonymous:
why?
Anonymous:
The reason is that "based on" modifies a noun, and "on the basis of" modifies a verb. This is a helpful distinction that's still observed in formal English.

Something can be based on something else--that is, "based on" is adjectival; it modifies a noun:

Our conclusions are based on these findings.
Discrimination based on disability is illegal as well as unjust.
These guidelines are based on our experience.
The movie is based on a novel.

In contrast, we do something on the basis of something else--that is, "on the basis of" is adverbial; it modifies a verb:

He was denied permission on the basis of his criminal record.
Rates are adjusted annually on the basis of the market index.
They have been ranked on the basis of their performance.
Entrants compete on the basis of speed.

So the correct original sentences are

He was hired on the basis of his experience.
The plan was decided on the basis of our budget.
Stop discrimination based on sex.

I hope this helps.
Anonymous:
Thank you for your clear explanation. It helps a lot! Cheers!
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