RE: Best regards, Kind regards, Yours sincerely page 5

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Anonymous:
Hi Barbara

What you think about this sentences:

We have just made the payment for my pro-forma n°4040.

I am waiting the bank send me the shift so i send a copy to you.

Can you please let me know when I shoud expect to shipper it?

Thanks

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Anonymous:
hi

In my opinion:

In US we greet people"how are you doing today" this is common, even if we meet him/her for the first time. this doesnt mean that we know how she/he was doing yesterday. its just making them more comfortable. and best regards comes in that category. we are expressing our regards for reading /spending time our mail/letter. and best regards that too.

and in this electronic and speeding world we cant always have a best printed hard copy to communicate every time.I think Email is one and only option after and before telephone.

Thank you

Best regards

sudarshan
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Anonymous:
Or we can just sign with our name, to save time for everybody. Or even take out the signature completely.



Alin
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A signature of some kind can be quite useful, e.g. when emails are forwarded to other parties.

MrP
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Anonymous:
depending if you know the person. first they would sign sincerely but then corresponding a couple more times turns into warm regards. In your case yours sincerely than best regards.

I have noticed that with my E-mails corresponding with professionals or business people.

I am glad nobody says fondly any more.
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Anonymous:
Hi, I was always told when I attended my PITMAN Shorthand School that if you started your letter with Dear Fred ( because you were familiar with the person you were writing to ) - you signed off withYours sincerely and when your letter started Dear Sir (being a business letter and you were unfamilar with the recipient) you signed off with Yours faithfully, and below the sign off the words: 'for and on behalf of: FRED BLOGS COMPANY' or 'for: FRED BLOGS COMPANY'.

I think it boils down to present day - we are all becoming very lazy with grammer and letter writing because we are in such a hurry to get everything done both in business and in leisure. You only have to look at the way children use the mobile phone text messages and that says it all. Who is going to teach proper english (if there will be such a thing in 30 years when we are shortening all the words in the sentence for speed, how will today's educated (I choose the word loosley) be able to teach English in the years ahead?
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Anonymous:
Dear Benny,

Good Evening!

Regarding to what you say, I also confuse of that.

I learn from my teach in language school, she also told us the same like your explanation: if you know the person, you can use "Yours sincerely", and if you do not know the person, you should use "Yours faithfully".



Emotion: smile

Yours Faithfully

Mavis Liu
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What part do you want corrected?
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To Anonymous who wrote the following:

"I think it boils down to present day - we are all becoming very lazy with grammer and letter writing because we are in such a hurry to get everything done both in business and in leisure. You only have to look at the way children use the mobile phone text messages and that says it all. Who is going to teach proper english (if there will be such a thing in 30 years when we are shortening all the words in the sentence for speed, how will today's educated (I choose the word loosley) be able to teach English in the years ahead?"
Proper English???

Firstly, you should spell "loosley" properly.

May I ask , how exactly you define "proper English"? Did Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton or Austen (for example) speak proper English? I'm sure you would have to say yes - unless you believe you speak or write more eloquently or "properly" than some of the greatest masters of the English language. I am not (of course) speaking about the form of their writing, but their lexicon and syntax (and what we can assume about their pronunciation). Are you also saying that Chaucer and Shakespeare (along with their contemporaries) could not spell? Every language is constantly developing and changing, in every way.

I am still wondering how you define "proper" English? Or should I say when you define "proper" English? Clearly "proper" English must have suddenly occured in the period in which you were educated.
New Member01
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