Best regards, Kind regards, Yours sincerely

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My company is going into new countries, everybody in the administration is taking an English course. During this course one teacher claimed that you should never, never use the greeting “Best regards”. Instead you should use “Yours sincerely” or “Kind regards”.
Well, when I went to business School in 1979 I only learned that you should only use the phrase "Yours faithfully,".
I have been reading the treads concerning this issue on the site. Frankly, I have just become more confused.
Reading this very long tread I think that one should conclude that if you know the person, you can use "Yours sincerely", and if you do not know the person, you should use "Yours faithfully".
Is this correct?
Someone wrote that you might capitalize the first letter in both words. What is the significance of that and what would it mean?

Yours faithfully,

Benny Bubel

More: Yours sincerely or Sincerely yours
New Member01
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Hi Benny,

Welcome to the Forum.

Email is still new enough that conventions are still evolving. It's far from universally agreed that the conventions for regular, non-email business letters will simply be automatically followed in email. Email began as an informal. 'short-hand' medium, and in fact most people still seem to be influenced by this. I don' think it will ever be as formal as non-email.

As regards how to end a business, non email letter, here's what I think. 'Best regards' and 'Kind regards' both seem to me suitable only for a personal letter to a friend. I see little or no difference between 'Best' and 'kind' here.' Yours faithfully' tends to sound old-fashioned today, and is seldom used. By far the most common is 'Yours sincerely'.

So, what to put at the end of a business email? Some people don't put anything at all. Others feel they should put something, as to them it feels wrong to just stop. I feel like that, here on the Forum, that's why I always end by putting 'Best wishes, Clive'. It's not a great choice, but it's relatively friendly and that's the habit I got into. But I'm not writing a business email.

You could just put nothing, except for a nice concluding paragraph. Or perhaps your name and/or the name of your company. Or maybe, you could put 'Regards'. I'd omit the 'kind/best' myself, and I'd only say 'regards' to someone I already know.

In a way, it doesn't matter too much what you put, because I don't think people much care what you write. They don't consciously read it, they see so many different endings and they themselves don't know what to write or to expect.

I'm sorry not to be of more help to you, but the whole subject is still in flux.

Best wishes, Clive
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That's interesting. "Best regards", "Kind regards", and "Kindest regards" are all fairly common in BrE business emails. "Best wishes" is also used.

You also sometimes see "Best" followed by a comma, which always disconcerts me.

MrP
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Just my take on it.

Let's look at the structure of an e-mail or a letter for that matter. Simply said you have 3 parts.

1. opening or greeting

2. body

3. closing or ending

NOTE: greeting means hello and not good-bye.

As was pointed out " yours faithfully " is out of style but it still can be found in use especially in British English. However, as was also pointed out, there are alternatives that are used in both British and American (North American) English.

1. More formal --- Sincerely yours, Yours sincerely, or even just Sincerely

2. less formal--- Sincerely, Kind/Best/Warm regards, Regards, *Best wishes

3. informal --- Best (wishes), Regards, * Just write your name *, See you, Thanks, etc., etc.

Not that this is a rule but in American English a comma is generally used after the greeting and after the closing.
Full Member154
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As far as the capitalization in the closing, my grammar book says to capitalize all letters only if it's a business letter or any other formal type of letter.

Best Regards,

Monseul
Junior Member53
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Anonymous:
MonseulAs far as the capitalization in the closing, my grammar book says to capitalize all letters only if it's a business letter or any other formal type of letter.

Best Regards,

Monseul
Capitalize the first word only (i.e., Thank you, Kind regards, etc.)
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"Kind Regards", "Best Wishes", etc. makes an email look a little like a greetings card. I'd only upper-case the first word.

MrP
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Bubeldk

Reading this very long tread I think that one should conclude that if you know the person, you can use "Yours sincerely", and if you do not know the person, you should use "Yours faithfully".

Some years ago, when I was taught how to write formal letters, they told me that this was indeed the rule.

Best,

Sextus

Regular Member731
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Other common expressions are:

All the best, All the best wishes, Cheers, which I think are neither formal nor informal. Or perhaps I'm wrong about this.

So, MrP, the use of "Best," disconcerts you...

Sextus
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