Anonymous:
Hi!

As a non-native English speaker, I've come to face a problem with the word "bolded"

I know "bold" is an adjective so we can use that word like this: the bold words.

How about "bolded"? Isn't "bolded" a word? I can't find "bolded" in any English dictionaries but in many web-pages written in English.

Is "the bolded words" a wrong phrase?
This is a problem for many people. The word 'embolden', which is the usual word for 'make bold', applies to bravery, not type sets. Actually, there is already a good verb for this: 'boldface' ('Please boldface the next 3 lines'), but it is almost unknown outside printers' circles. With the amount of boldfacing that is going on these days on the internet, I would not be surprised if 'bold/bolded/bolded' as a verb soon enters the dictionaries.
Veteran Member92,080
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Why not simply say "words in bold"?
New Member05
You might, but that is not the thrust of this discussion.
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Anonymous:
No, it's fine. Regardless of whether it's found in dictionaries, it has been in usage for centuries

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Citations:bolded#English
Anonymous:
I'm afraid you've made a rather quick -- and fallacious -- judgement here.

Close reading of the Wikipedia article you reference reveals no support for "centuries of use" of the word "bolded."
  • The oldest reference (an 1899 essay quoting a letter from 1540) contains the other meaning of bolded (made brave).
  • The next reference (a textbook from 1981 -- hardly "centuries" old) contains boldface treatment of key terms. The Wikipedia author describes those key terms as "bolded," but does not provide evidence that the textbook contains the word "bolded."
In fact, the earliest actual usage of the word "bolded" cited in this Wikipedia entry occurs in 2001 -- and it is used not in the primary copy of the text but in revision notes.
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