Anonymous:
Hello,

I have a question concerning the use of the past participle 'brung'.

I was wondering what the origin and use of this form is.

I could think of several possibilities:

- analogy (like children would make) with verbs like ring (-rang-rung).

- dialectic forms. I.e. used regional. If so I would like to know in which dialects this form is used. Or was used in the past..(?)

- an old form that isn't been used that much anymore b/c it has been replaced with brought. (Not very likely I suppose.)

(But, after all there is a general tendency in English to narrow down the range of verb forms, maybe this is a next stage?)

I don't know whether the form 'brung' was used in older English literature. I do know that Mark Twain used it. (Apparently it is a form widely used in spoken language in the southern states. (?))

Also Morrissey (former leadsinger of 'The Smiths', from Manchester, England) uses 'brung' in the song 'I have Forgiven Jesus' (i.e. "Forgive me any pain I may have brung to you").

I also heard that 'brung' was used in an older form of the Dublin dialect but isn't around anymore.

So, I guess it is used on both sides of the 'pond'. I don't know about Australia.

Thank you in advance for any response.

-- Daphne, Belgium.
bring brought brought Weak with Rückumlaut and Germanic spirant law

I always thought of "brung" as an alternative form for "brang". Many young children seem to use "brang" or "brung" before they are corrected--sort of like fish-fishes or ox-oxes.
e.g.
I brang it to school with me.
or
I brung it to school with me.

But I've never heard: *I have brung it with me.
Regular Member638
Marvin A.bring brought brought Weak with Rückumlaut and Germanic spirant law
Many young children seem to use "brang" or "brung" before they are corrected--sort of like fish-fishes or ox-oxes.
.
Sorry to chime in but the fish-fishes issue bothers me. When was it acceptable/right to you use fishes?
Full Member297
Zerox
Marvin A.bring brought brought Weak with Rückumlaut and Germanic spirant law
Many young children seem to use "brang" or "brung" before they are corrected--sort of like fish-fishes or ox-oxes.
.
Sorry to chime in but the fish-fishes issue bothers me. When was it acceptable/right to you use fishes?
When I was 4 years old.
Hi Daphne

For information on bring, click [url=http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=bring&searchmode=none ]here.[/url]

Cheers
CB
Veteran Member7,902
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Thanks a lot for your responses.
New Member03
Anonymous:
I have heard "I have bung". In fact, in dialects that use brang and brung the distinction is "bring" present, "brang" simple past, and "brung" past participle.


I have heard "I have bung"
Yes, this is cooperspeak.
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