Capitalization

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Anonymous:
I am required to type board meeting minutes, and I'm have a problem with capitalizing commen words within the minutes. The minutes are from a coopertive board of directors meeting When should board, directors, and cooperative be capitalized within the minutes? From what I have learned, these words are a generalization, a discription, but my fellow employee insists on capitalizing them.
Hi,

Such things are usually a matter of style and convention. I think I'd probably capitalize them.

That's how I usually see such things done.

Best wishes, Clive
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Anonymous:
I need more informaiton.

Example sentence: The Board of Directors voted to extend an invitaiton to the directors and the employees of the cooperative.

Directors and employees are not proper nouns, cooperative is not the business name, maybe a pronoun? Can you tell me a rule?

When I first started my job there were a lot of comments posted about over capitalization. Upon further research, I'm seeing the word "specific" associated with capitalized.
Hi,

Hi,

I need more informaiton.

Example sentence: The Board of Directors voted to extend an invitaiton to the directors and the employees of the cooperative.

Directors and employees are not proper nouns, nor is 'board' is a proper noun ccooperative is not the business name, maybe a pronoun? <<< no, it's used as a noun here. Can you tell me a rule?

When I first started my job there were a lot of comments posted about over capitalization. Upon further research, I'm seeing the word "specific" associated with capitalized.

There is really no 'rule'. You just have to chose a way of doing it and then try to be be consistent. Too much capitalization can certainly be irritating to the reader.

You might, for example, decide to always capitalize the phrase 'Board of Directors', and the words 'Board' and 'Co-operative'.

You and your colleague should really both follow the same conventions, if you are typing the same kind of text for the same employers/customers.

Maybe other people here will offer you other opinions on this kind of style matter. Let's see if they do.

Best wishes again, Clive
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Anonymous:
Clive,

Thank you for helping me. Let's take this a litter farther, why would Board be a noun but not employees?

Deb
Anonymous:
When referring to this specific board or the actions of "the Board," capitalize it.

The Board passed a motion to . . . .

otherwise, it is "board'

Same with directors and the cooperative.

.
Hi,

why would Board be a proper noun but not employees?

There are two practical reasons.

1. Because that's how I usually see people do it in their writing.

2. In most texts, I think the word 'employee(s)' appears a lot more than the word 'Board', so you would often end up with perhaps excessive capitalization.

In addition, the 'Board' and the 'Co-operative' seem to be in a sense quasi-legal entities that can make decisions. This does not seem to be the case with 'employees'.

Best wishes again, Clive
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Anonymous:
What you are telling me makes sense, but making the distinction will be a little tricky. I sure wish it were black and white!

Thank you for responding,

Deb
Unfortunately, when it comes to style, there is no black & white. What is more important is to be consistent.

I agree completely with what Clive said. The Board of Directors met today. The Board decided - it takes the status of a proper noun because you are referring to this specific board of directors.

I tend to use more lower case than capitals, but you and the other person who do the minutes need to come up with a "Style Guide" that will list exactly how you will do this, and then follow it precisely.
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