Could you please tell me if this sentence has the correct punctuation marks in the correct order, and if it makes sense?

"Is that you Susan?," he asked the maid downstairs.

Or should the comma come before the question mark and hence 'he' will start with a capital letter. If it is correct, is it always true that commas follow the question mark and not vice versa?

One more question please. When I attended a Grammar school 30 years ago, I left after my G.C.E. o'levels because of the clamour for jobs, so the memory of my grammar is diminishing fast, but with your expert help, I hope to rectify that.[Y]

When at school I was sure that there was a rule with commas that they didn't come before 'and' or 'because', e.g., it seems to have drained him and created a bout of "severe cramp," because he was unable to complete the match.

You must use the commas, and your sentence will look like this:

Many thanks in advance.
P.S. We all know that school rhymes are not always true, as in "I before E except after C". I think I could name about ten off the top of my head where this isn't true, e.g., weird, vein, etc. etc.
New Member37
Could you please tell me if this sentence has the correct punctuation marks in the correct order, and if it makes sense? "Is that you Susan?," he asked the maid downstairs.-- It makes sense, but the comma should be deleted; punctuation marks (except brackets) cannot follow each other directly.

Or should the comma come before the question mark and hence 'he' will start with a capital letter. -- No. See above. If it is correct, is it always true that commas follow the question mark and not vice versa?-- No. See above

When at school I was sure that there was a rule with commas that they didn't come before 'and' or 'because', e.g., it seems to have drained him and created a bout of "severe cramp," because he was unable to complete the match.-- A comma precedes 'and' when it is a conjunction between 2 independent clauses and sometimes when 'and' precedes the last item in a list. Otherwise, it is omitted. Commas before 'because' are used if the clause seems non-restrictive but are omitted if the clause seems restrictive.

P.S. We all know that school rhymes are not always true, as in "I before E except after C". I think I could name about ten off the top of my head where this isn't true, e.g., weird, vein, etc. etc.-- Good for you.
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Anonymous:
If the letter after a question mark must be capitalized, shouldn't the correct version of this be:

"Is that you Susan?" He asked the maid downstairs.

If not, what's the grammar rule here?
The accepted method is:

"Is that you, Susan?" he asked the maid downstairs.

There are two 'rules' involved here. (1) The punctuation within the quoation marks belongs to the quote or utterance and is not a punctuation of the overall sentence. (2) Quotations are set off by the introductory or other text (He said; said he) with quotation marks alone; any other punctuation is redundant or obfuscatory.
SystemAdministrator: A system administrator takes care of the inner workings of the entire system. These users have the ability to promote, ban and modify other users.Teachers: Users in this role are certified teachers. This may include DELTA, CELTA, TESOL, TEFL qualified professionals. Email a scan of your qualification to an admin, if you wish to be considered.
Anonymous:
Have a look here: http://www.whitesmoke.com/question-mark-usage

where it says

Question mark style conventions

1. Do not use a comma after a question mark occurring in the middle of a sentence.
"You didn't actually agree to that offer?" her boss asked incredulously.
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