Comma confusion

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lee:
"In my present job I have matured as much as I can within the duties that I have been given, and now feel ready to move on towards other challenges."
In the above statement is the comma after 'given' warranted?

Actually, I'm often perplexed by commas. I know that a clause contains subject/verb/object and a conjunction might link those clauses...and a comma must always preceed this conjunction, yes?
And does it matter that the subject in the second part (I) has been left out. By removing the 'I' does the clause lose it's subject and therefore lose its comma. My, my. So confused. TIA.
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Skitt:
[nq:1]"In my present job I have matured as much as I can within the duties that I have been given, ... By removing the 'I' does the clause lose it's subject and therefore lose its comma. My, my. So confused. TIA.[/nq]
I'd leave the comma and put the "I" back in as the subject for the last part of the sentence. If the "I" is not there, the comma should not be there either.
I am not an English punctuation expert, so we'll see if anyone else has a better idea.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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R J Valentine:
}
}> "In my present job I have matured as much as I can within the duties }> that I have been given, and now feel ready to move on towards other }> challenges."
}>
}> In the above statement is the comma after 'given' warranted? }>
}> Actually, I'm often perplexed by commas. I know that a clause contains }> subject/verb/object and a conjunction might link those clauses...and a }> comma must always preceed this conjunction, yes? }>
}> And does it matter that the subject in the second part (I) has been }> left out. By removing the 'I' does the clause lose it's subject and }> therefore lose its comma. My, my. So confused. TIA. }
} I'd leave the comma and put the "I" back in as the subject for the last part } of the sentence. If the "I" is not there, the comma should not be there } either.
}
} I am not an English punctuation expert, so we'll see if anyone else has a } better idea.
Not likely; you're right. Unless the question as to whether the sentence is a smart one to include is open for the asking. Then someone might have a better idea.

R. J. Valentine
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CyberCypher:
"Skitt" (Email Removed) wrote on 05 Mar 2004:
[nq:2]"In my present job I have matured as much as ... and therefore lose its comma. My, my. So confused. TIA.[/nq]
[nq:1]I'd leave the comma and put the "I" back in as the subject for the last part of the sentence. ... be there either. I am not an English punctuation expert, so we'll see if anyone else has a better idea.[/nq]
I agree.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
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Michael West:
[nq:1]"In my present job I have matured as much as I can within the duties that I have been given, and now feel ready to move on towards other challenges." In the above statement is the comma after 'given' warranted?[/nq]
Yes.
[nq:1]Actually, I'm often perplexed by commas.[/nq]
Never let them know that.
[nq:1]I know that a clause contains subject/verb/object and a conjunction might link those clauses...and a comma must always preceed this conjunction, yes?[/nq]
Not always, but a comma is usually recommended before a conjunction that introduces an independent clause.
[nq:1]And does it matter that the subject in the second part (I) has been left out. By removing the 'I' does the clause lose it's subject and therefore lose its comma. My, my. So confused. TIA.[/nq]
When the subject is the same for both clauses and
is expressed only once, a comma is useful if the
connective is "but". When the connective is "and", the comma should be omitted if the relation between the two statements is close or immediate.
So there's a judgment call there. I think your sentence is better with the comma.
I think a more serious problem for you to consider is whether it makes sense to say "I have matured ... within the duties ..." We don't normally mature "within" duties, it seems to me. I'll leave it to you to decide whether it needs fixing.

Michael West
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lee:
[nq:1]I think a more serious problem for you to consider is whether it makes sense to say "I have matured ... don't normally mature "within" duties, it seems to me. I'll leave it to you to decide whether it needs fixing.[/nq]
OK, now I'm curious. If not 'within', what preposition should/might you use?
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CyberCypher:
lee (Email Removed) wrote on 06 Mar 2004:
[nq:2]I think a more serious problem for you to consider ... leave it to you to decide whether it needs fixing.[/nq]
[nq:1]OK, now I'm curious. If not 'within', what preposition should/might you use?[/nq]
I think the prepostional phrase that fits here is a bit verbose: "within the scope of the duties that I have been given". I agree with Michael that it is not a normal construction, but I have no problem with the expression at all. It strikes me as a reasonable idiom that should exist if it does not already exist.
You might consider changing it to "I have matured as much as I can given the duties of my present position, and I now feel ready to move on to other challenges". I think "towards" should be changed to "to". "towards" means "in the direction of", but you want a new job, so that requires "to".

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
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Skitt:
[nq:2]OK, now I'm curious. If not 'within', what preposition should/might you use?[/nq]
[nq:1]I think the prepostional phrase that fits here is a bit verbose: "within the scope of the duties that I ... be changed to "to". "towards" means "in the direction of", but you want a new job, so that requires "to".[/nq]
You forgot a comma after "can" in your first sentence sample of the last paragraph.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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Michael West:
[nq:2]OK, now I'm curious. If not 'within', what preposition should/might you use?[/nq]
[nq:1]I think the prepostional phrase that fits here is a bit verbose: "within the scope of the duties that I ... the direction of", but you want a new job, so that requires "to". Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.[/nq]
That works for me, too.
I'd probably look for something other than "maturity" to talk about there; "I have matured" leaves me without any very clear sense of what the writer means. The OP might find it more effective to talk about what one has learned, or what specific abilities one has developed and demonstrated in the current position, and what value one could bring to the organization if given a chance. "I have matured as much as I can" almost
sounds like making excuses.

Michael West
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