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Hi,

If you are quoting something however short or long, do you have to put a comma after the word 'said'?

How about after the word 'named', do you have put a comma after that?

I am asking these because I see different ways of writing for these types of situations.
Contributing Member1,969
Hi Believer (again Emotion: smile)

You can write:

He said, "I want to go home." Or:
He said: "I want to go home."

A comma is very common especially when the quotation is short. I don't understand your question regarding 'named'.

Cheers
CB
Veteran Member8,025
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I think, Believer, is referring to "My friend named Peter ... " (No comma needed).

Believer, please let me know whether I guessed correctly.

CB

1. He said, "I want to go home." Or:
2. He said: "I want to go home."

Is #1 with the comma BrE, and #2 with the colon AmE?
Veteran Member8,073
I have NEVER used a colon before a direct quotation, so it's not a "default" American English style.
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Thank you, CB.

Thank you for answering in your cool unique way.
Hi, Yoong Liat.

I think I was thinking about those names of long articles that are longer than a word or two. As to the first question, I am seeing more and more cases where short contents are quoted without having a comma in front of it like this:

When asked about our favorite sports, I said "Basketball" and he said "Baseball." (See no commas.)

When asked about what we do during our spare time, I said "I play basketball," and he said "I play baseball."

(See still no commas but I think commas are preferred. What is the guideline?)

When asked about what we do during the afternoon, I said, "I go shopping and then do some house chores but it varies day to day," and he said, "Unlike my friend, I usually runs and read books."

(Here, commas seem to be almost mandatory.)
BelieverHi, Yoong Liat.

When asked about our favorite sports, I said "Basketball" and he said "Baseball." (See no commas.)

When asked about what we do during our spare time, I said "I play basketball," and he said "I play baseball."

(See still no commas but I think commas are preferred. What is the guideline?)

Strictly speaking, there should be a comma after 'said'.
Anonymous:
If you are directly quoting someone, then yes, you would put the comma after said.
Anonymous:
So you only use a comma affter the word said when quoting? I only ask becasue in " the only grammar book you will ever need" there is an example paragrah for useing transitional words. In this paragraph there is a comma affter siad in the sentence " Sarah said, Bill was just my type." But there is no comma affter said in following sentence " She said that he was quite an avid reader for one thing; therefore, we would have lots to talk about. "

So whats the deal with that?
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