comma or not?

8 replies
Anonymous:
Hi there,

Can anyone help me with the following sentence? Although some have given me explanations, I still don't understand why there is a comma before 'though'? Then when we should and should not put a comma before the words 'although', 'though', 'because' when they are placed to join two sentences together. Please help.

Thanks in advance.

Aspiring to be an advanced knowledge economy, Beijing needs the great majority, if not all, of our students to success, academically and professionally, though individuals may attain achievement at differeent paces.

Simon
AnonymousHi there,

Can anyone help me with the following sentence? Although some have given me explanations, I still don't understand why there is a comma before 'though'? Then when we should and should not put a comma before the words 'although', 'though', 'because' when they are placed to join two sentences together. Please help.

Thanks in advance.

Aspiring to be an advanced knowledge economy, Beijing needs the great majority, if not all, of our students to success, academically and professionally, though individuals may attain achievement at differeent paces.

Simon
A quick answer, though not necessarily the ultimate. You have several phrases, and the last needs to separated from them. Success should be "succeed", the verb
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Anonymous:
Hi there

So do you mean in normal situations, the comma before 'though' should not be there. Since there are several phrases in the sentence, it is better to separate them by using a comma.

Simon
I'd say that if you don't have a that before though or even though, you need the comma.

It's a paranthesis, a secondary argument, and it must be separated.

See examples here:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22though+individuals%22+&btnG=Google+Search
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Anonymous:
You should put a comma before "though," because the words following it is an independent clause (it has both a subject and a verb). However, the sentence, overall, is incorrect because it's a type of run-on called a comma splice.
Anonymous:
Aspiring to be an advanced knowledge economy, Beijing needs the great majority, if not all, of our students to succeed, academically and professionally, though individuals may attain achievement at different paces.

'Though' in this sentence isn't clearly defined because of the comma. The only time you would usually put a comma before 'though' would be at the end of a sentence:

This example is right, though. (Meaning 'however')

Or in a phrase that can be put in parenthesis:

This example, though it is simple, is right. (Meaning 'even though' or 'in spite of the fact')

This example, though, is right. (Meaning 'however' in the context of 'on the other hand' – a contrast)

As a conjunction, 'though' begins a dependent clause, and unless it is a parenthetical phrase or contrast, it should never have a comma before it. (The same goes for 'although'.)

Though this example is simple, it is right.

'Though' isn't commonly used to connect sentences, however, and is usually replaced by variations of the same meaning:

This example is right even though it is simple. (Meaning 'despite the fact that')

Aspiring to be an advanced knowledge economy, Beijing needs its students to succeed both academically and professionally; however, individuals may attain achievement at different paces.
Anonymous:
The parenthetic phrase "academically and professionally" needs to be set off from the rest of the sentence by either no commas or a pair of commas. This applies whether or not you agree that a comma should be used before an independent clause introduced by a conjunction such as "and" or "but". (In this sentence, "though" is equivalent to "but" or "yet", not "although".) See Rules 2 and 4 on this page:
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/commas.htm
Anonymous:
i can not help you with why there should or should not be a comma before the word though. what i can tell you is that sentence would do far better as 2 or 3 sentences. avoid the problem altogether. plus, success should be succeed i think. different is spelled incorrectly.
Anonymous:
AnonymousAspiring to be an advanced knowledge economy, Beijing needs its students to succeed both academically and professionally; however, individuals may attain achievement at different paces.
I agree this version of the sentence is more coherent than the original. However, I have one problem with it: the use of the noun "knowledge" to modify another noun, "economy." Though such phrasing has become colloquial, I think it's choppy.

Try: "Because Beijing aspires to have an economy built on advanced knowledge, its students need to suceed both academically and professionally; however, each may do so at his own pace."
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