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I'm aware that periods should be put inside of quotes, as in this example:
The woman told me that I need to "do something useful with my life."

But I hadn't previously thought that commas belonged inside of quotes. I began to wonder about this while reading Walter Kaufmann's translation of Nietzsche's "Beyond Good and Evil" - he frequently uses them as in the following example:
And then the man said "sit down," and so I sat.

I'd previously thought that the following would be correct:
And then the man said "sit down", and so I sat.

Is one of these ways simply wrong, or are both correct?
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And then the man said, "Sit down," and so I sat.

Yes, commas should go inside of quotation marks for quoted speech (and also a comma after the reporting verb), but periods needn't-- it depends on which side of the Atlantic you reside.

The woman told me that I need to "do something useful with my life".
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Mister Micawber And then the man said, "Sit down," and so I sat.

Yes, commas should go inside of quotation marks for quoted speech (and also a comma after the reporting verb),

Thanks. Good to know.

Mister Micawber but periods needn't-- it depends on which side of the Atlantic you reside.
The woman told me that I need to "do something useful with my life".

Oh? I live in America, and that's the way I've always seen it done. Are you living in England?
Anonymous:
(This is Mr Micawber again-- I am Anonymous here because I forgot to sign in... again.-- MM)

No, I'm in Yokohama, where the periods are indecipherable-- but I've been at EF long enough to learn a thing or two. Which reminds me: welcome to English Forums!

Periods with Quotation Marks

American Style
5.11: When a declarative or an imperative sentence is enclosed in quotation marks, the period ending the sentence is, in what may be called the American style, placed inside the closing quotation mark. If the quoted sentence is included within another sentence, its terminal period is omitted or replaced by a comma, as required, unless it comes at the end of the including sentence. In the latter case, a single period serves both sentences and is placed inside the closing quotation mark.

"There is no reason to inform the president."
"It won't be necessary to inform the president," said Emerson.
Emerson replied nervously, "The president doesn't wish to be informed about such things."
5.12: … In those rare circumstances when confusion is likely, the period not only may, but perhaps should, be placed after the quotation mark.


The first line of Le Beau's warning to Orlando has long been regarded as reading "Good sir, I do in friendship counsel you".

Turner's memory suddenly faltered when he came to the speech beginning "Good sir, I do in friendship counsel you."
The …example above,… may be imagined as being included in a work of textual criticism, the location of the period warns against the incorrect assumption that the quoted line ends with a period. In the final example, however, which may be imagined as forming a part of an account of an actor's performance, the exquisitely technical question of the position of the period is largely irrelevant and may therefore yield to "American practice."

British versus American Style
5.13: The British style of positioning periods and commas in relation to the closing quotation mark is based on the same logic that in the American system governs the placement of question marks and exclamation points: if they belong to the quoted material, they are placed within the closing quotation mark; if they belong to the including sentence as a whole, they are placed after the quotation mark….

A. Timm's additional explanation of the British style:
For example, if the sentence you are quoting reads:

Those men are beating that child.
The quoting sentence might read:

The woman cried, 'Those men are beating that child.'
The period after child belongs to the original sentence, therefore it goes inside the quotation mark. But, if the sentence you are quoting reads:

Those men are beating that child in the park.
Then the quoting sentence would read:

The woman cried, 'Those men are beating that child'.
Since in this case the original did not have a period after child.

Anonymous:
comma goes first
Anonymous:
What about in singing "Killing Me Softly" she won the first place and...
I would write In singing "Killing Me Softly," she won...

But that's the American way.
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Anonymous:
I'm 49 and the more I read the rules for punctuation, the less they make sense. No wonder people say English is the hardest language to learn.

So what is the reason for putting a comma inside a quotation mark?

Thanks.
So,
If the question is the thread title, "Should a 15 yr old who committed premeditated murder be tried as an adult", then the answer is no.
or
If the question is the thread title, "Should a 15 yr old who committed premeditated murder be tried as an adult," then the answer is no.
?
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