Comparative/as...as?

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1. He does not sing as good as she does.

2. He does not sing as good as she is doing.

3. He does not sing as good as she.

Hello Grammar Teacher/Teachers,

What are the differences of grammar among the sentences ?

Thank you.

With best wishes.
Full Member116
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None of them are good. Try these:

1. He does not sing as well as she does. -- The comparison applies at any time.

2. He does not sing as well as she is doing.-- The comparison is to her singing now.

3. He does not sing as well as she. -- Same as #1
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Hey, Mr.M,

Am I right thinking that there is a double meaning in such sentences?

1) He doesn't sing as well as she. -- He sings worse than she.

2) He doesn't sing as well as she. -- Neither he nor she sings.

Or am I a bit confused with "as well as"?..
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There are plenty of ambiguities in any language if you look hard, Ruslana. That's why it must always be considered in context.
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Lana, lovely avatar!

I think you may be thinking of it like this: He doesn't sing; nor does she. Could that be it?
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Thanks, Barb. Emotion: smile Yep, that's exactly what I was thinking about.

MM, I know there are lots of ambiguities in any language. I just wanted to make sure it was not my fantasy but indeed an ambiguity. Thanks!
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Hello Grammar Teacher,

I would like to thank you for your advice. I am glad of accepting ' as well as ' but am ignorance of its form and meaning.

Could you tell me what form (adjective or ? ) and meaning the word ' well ' is ?

Thank you.

With best wishes.
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As well as has two common meanings with unrelated structures:

1-- in as good a manner as: I can swim as well as Kosuke Kitajima. Thisis an equal comparative structure, with well an adverb.
2-- in addition to: I can swim as well as dive. This is an idiomatic phrasal preposition.
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Anonymous:
Can't it also be "He does not sign as well as her"?

Can you explain why or why not? I've been looking for the rule all day. Thanks!
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