Complex Verbs -> Simplex Nouns (morphological question)

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Billcow :
Hi! Could you give me a couple of examples of English complex verbs from which simplex nouns denoting a profession were derived? Comparing to Polish: there is a morphologically complex verb 'pilot-owac' (to pilot) from which simplex noun was derived 'pilot' (a pilot), so the affix '-owac' was cut off. We have lots of nouns denoting professions derived from verbs in English but these are more complex than the verbs: to perform -> perform-er, to clean -> clean-er, and many many more with the agentive '-er' ending. It is really hard to find an example similar to that of Polish that is why I am asking you. By the way, could you also think of other agentive suffixes in English?
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Pat Durkin:
[nq:1]Hi! Could you give me a couple of examples of English complex verbs from which simplex nouns denoting a profession ... that is why I am asking you. By the way, could you also think of other agentive suffixes in English?[/nq]
I don't speak or read Polish, but your example verb>noun looks as though it has been imported from English. Could that be the reason it is so complex? Could the simplex verb have been formed from the imported noun (and/or verb) "pilot"?
There may be examples in English that may fulfill your description, as many people do tend to use fancy words and then make them fancier with suffixes.
Syllable>to syllabicate, syllabify>syllabication (noun>verb>noun). As a joke, people might imitate our president (Bush 43) by changing either of the above possible words (I haven't heard syllabify, nor have I looked it up in a dictionary) to "syllabimacatifigation". Signify>signification/significance>to sign. I think these examples are all from Latin roots, but am not sure.
Magnify>magnification/magnificence. Yeah. I got into a rut there.

Normally we simplify by nouning verbs and verbing nouns, as with "pilot".
Navigate is a synonym of to pilot. One who navigates is a navigator, (or pilot or flier(to fly) or sailor (to sail) one who determines a course for a ship or plane using astronomic data or electronic means. (aviate>aviation/aviator/aviatrix)
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Glenn Knickerbocker:
[nq:2]Comparing to Polish: there is a morphologically complex verb 'pilot-owac' ... 'pilot' (a pilot), so the affix '-owac' was cut off.[/nq]
[nq:1]complex? Could the simplex verb have been formed from the imported noun (and/or verb) "pilot"?[/nq]
Pat's right, you've got this backwards. "Pilot" comes from French via English or German, and "-owac" is added to it to make a verb. In English, we have four common productive verb suffixes from different sources: "-ize" ultimately from Greek, "-ate" from Latin, "-fy" from Latin via French, and "-en" from German.
¬R
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mm:
[nq:1]Syllable>to syllabicate, syllabify>syllabication (noun>verb>noun). As a joke, people might imitate our president (Bush 43) by changing either of the above possible words (I haven't heard syllabify, nor have I looked it up in a dictionary) to "syllabimacatifigation".[/nq]
And don't forget "grammaticality".
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Billcow :
I may get this backwards (there are two theories about the direction, however I can't cite them as I still don't quite understand them), but this is not what my point is. I am still searching for more complex verbs than nouns in English, connected with PROFESSIONS and of course with themselves (N-V pairs where N-V are from the same family like: perform - performer) (that is why the words 'syllable, 'syllabify' etc. are out). Could you think of any? Or maybe perhaps there aren't any? No matter what the direction of derivation was.
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Glenn Knickerbocker:
[nq:1]I may get this backwards (there are two theories about the direction, however I can't cite them as I still don't quite understand them),[/nq]
I wouldn't be at all surprised if native words went both directions, but in the case of borrowed words like "pilot" the noun clearly came first.
[nq:1]is not what my point is. I am still searching for more complex verbs than nouns in English, connected with ... N-V are from the same family like: perform - performer) (that is why the words 'syllable, 'syllabify' etc. are out).[/nq]
I see, you want pairs where the noun is the agent, not the recipient or outcome of the action. Informally, "-ate" or "-ize" are sometimes used that way facetiously: a poet might poetize, for instance. Otherwise, such formations are mostly irregular and tend to have a feel of antiquity or officiality to them. "Prophet/prophesy" is the only example I've managed to produce so far. I think there are a few in "-en" and "-er" but none are coming to mind. Oh, and a few are formed with prefixes, like "adjudge," but not in any regular way.
¬R / Darla: Leftovers aren't the mark of a man. \ www.bestweb.net/~notr Andrew Reid: Actually, they are, because that's how men's shirts button.
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Billcow :
[nq:1]I see, you want pairs where the noun is the agent, not the recipient or outcome of the action. Informally, ... are coming to mind. Oh, and a few are formed with prefixes, like "adjudge," but not in any regular way.[/nq]
Thanks, at least two examples, that's fine as I know they're difficult to be found.
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