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Anonymous:
Hi,

When you are sending your condolences for someone sick, wishing him/her well, are you sending a condolence or condolences -- a singular or plural?
I've only ever seen condolences in the plural, but I've also only seen it used in relation to someone's death, not illness.
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Grammar GeekI've only ever seen condolences in the plural, but I've also only seen it used in relation to someone's death, not illness.
Ditto on both points. I would strongly advise against using it in a "get well" card situation....might be jumping the gun, so to speak.
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Anonymous:
condolence is singular.
EX.my condolence.
condolences plural.
EX.our condolences to your family.
Anonymouscondolence is singular.EX.my condolence.condolences plural.EX.our condolences to your family.
And do you say to someone "My condolence on the loss of your father"?

I am only familiar with its use in the plural. My condolences on...
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Anonymous:
If condolence means sympathy, why would you say "condolences"? You would not say "sympathys," whether it was "my" or "our."
Anonymous:
You would not ever write "sympathys." You might write or say "sympathies" though.

From TheFreeDictionary.com :

sym·pa·thy (smp-th)

n. pl. sym·pa·thies
1.
a. A relationship or an affinity between people or things in which whatever affects one correspondingly affects the other.

b. Mutual understanding or affection arising from this relationship or affinity.

2.
a. The act or power of sharing the feelings of another.

b. A feeling or an expression of pity or sorrow for the distress of another; compassion or commiseration. Often used in the plural. See Synonyms at pity .

3. Harmonious agreement; accord: He is in sympathy with their beliefs.

4. A feeling of loyalty; allegiance. Often used in the plural: His sympathies lie with his family.

5. Physiology A relation between parts or organs by which a disease or disorder in one induces an effect in the other.
Anonymous:
The same way you say "Congratulations" and not "Congratulation".
Anonymous:
congratulation on your explanations. did I say it rights?
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