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Can someone explain "at all material time"? What specific meaning would it convey in legal documents?

Does the following sentense make any sense?

"At all material time during the course of the Plaintiff's renovation work, he constantly committed negligence?"

Armstrong
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The sentence does not really sound as legalese as it does slightly EFLese-- perhaps they are similar, though. I would guess that 'at all material time' means 'most of the time' or 'during a significant percentage of the total time'. The phrase, no matter how interpreted, however, seems inconsistent with 'constantly'.
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at all practical times, at all times
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The interesting question is why "material" is used if "at all times" suffices. why do solicitors love to use "at all material time"?
"Material time" seems a verbatim translation from Italian.
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When used in a legal context, doesn't 'material' usually mean 'relevant to the matter at hand'? To me, this usage would be a legalese way of differentiating "all of the time" (i.e. literally all of the time, including the guy's time off, possible work elsewhere, etc, in the time frame of the renovation) from "all of the time during which he was physically present at the location of and working on this particular renovation".
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Yankee,

Now your explanation makes a lot sense about the specific menaing of "at all material time" in the legal context. Previosuly I understand "material" generically means "relevent" or "important". Yours is the most precise definition.
I agree with Yankee -- I think it means "at all time relevant to the legal case under consideration."
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Anonymous:
the word material is usually used to show that they are speaking of most of the time.
In accounting material error means a mistake which can cause the financial report to be mistated in a very large value or may mislead the decision making of investors.

In the context of law, it sounds more to like practical or make sense. Which can affect the agreement or contract.

Hope this helps. Correct me if Im wrong.

Kumar
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