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Please answer the comparative degree for the folling statement:
"Tom is older than albert".
regards,
sri
Regular Member626
I have no idea what you're talking about.

What does it mean to "answer the comparative degree"?

I can answer a question; I can answer a person who asks a question; but I cannot "answer the comparative degree". I don't think the comparative degree would even understand my answer.

Emotion: smile
CJ
Veteran Member53,486
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Dear Mr.CJ,

Thanks for your response, even it is negative.

There is a subject called degrees of comparison in english grammar. I think you might have not come across the topic yet. I asked that question to give its comparative degree. The statement: Tom is older than albert, is a statement, and I wanted its comparative degree without changing the meaning. Please go through the following example;

Traditional English grammar uses the comparative form when comparing exactly two things, and the superlative when comparing three or more.

PositiveComparativeSuperlative
GoodBetterBest
BeautifulMore BeautifulMost Beautiful
BigBiggerBiggest
TallTallerTallest
SincereMore SincereMost Sincere
SmallSmallerSmallest


I never asked you to give answer for this question. It was your own interest to reply the query.

Regards,

sri
sreesriThe statement: Tom is older than albert, is a statement, and I wanted its comparative degree without changing the meaning.
I am sorry to say that I must repeat that I do not know what you are asking, if anything.

older is the comparative degree of old.

Since the sentence already contains the comparative degree, I don't know why you are saying that you want its comparative degree. Did you simply want to know which word in that sentence illustrated the comparative degree? If so, then that word is "older".

CJ
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
I don`t think your sentence need any comparative degree ``older `` is a comparative degree of the adjective ``old``.
So in your sentence the age of two people is compared. My advice is to clarify you question
New Member32
* Please clarify your question.
Dear Mr.CJ,

Yes, it is true that the statement is in comparative degree. I just wanted to know the positive degree for this statement without changing the meaning.

With high regards,

sri
Hello,

I think of knowing the positive degree for this statement without changing the meaning.

regards,

sri
sreesriPlease answer the comparative degree for the folling statement:

"Tom is older than albert".

regards,

sri

Hello,

I think of knowing the positive degree for this statement without changing the meaning.

regards,

sri

Hi sri,

Well, your question itself is confusing. Please go through the grammar part that you have learnt about 'degrees of comparison' and come forward again with your question if the same doubt continues.

Thanks.

Full Member265
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