Anonymous:
Could any one tell me which one below is right? And please explain why.

"It is not depend on you"
"It is not depends on you"

Thank you

Sam
Neither I'm afraid.

It does not depend on you.
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Anonymous:
Dear nona the brit,

Thank you for your reply, so I got a question then. "It does not depend on you", I assume the "does" and "depend", they both are verb. And I believe that, there should be only one verb in a sentence in english. Please explain.

Thank you.
Hello, Anon!

Nona doesn't seem to be online presently, so allow me to butt in...

First of all, don't mix a "sentence" and a "clause". There can be only one conjugated verb in a clause, but a sentence can be composed of several clauses: "When she saw I was there, she got up, gathered her clothes and exited through the backdoor. One different color for a different clause.

"It doesn't depend on you": a correct English negative sentence/clause is built this way: S + Aux. + not + Verb.

Here, "does" is the auxiliary, and it requires a bare infinitive, "depend". So, "depend" is the verb, "does" is an auxiliary in this context.

Does it answer your question?
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Anonymous:
PieanneHello, Anon!

Nona doesn't seem to be online presently, so allow me to butt in...

First of all, don't mix a "sentence" and a "clause". There can be only one conjugated verb in a clause, but a sentence can be composed of several clauses: "When she saw I was there, she got up, gathered her clothes and exited through the backdoor. One different color for a different clause.

"It doesn't depend on you": a correct English negative sentence/clause is built this way: S + Aux. + not + Verb.

Here, "does" is the auxiliary, and it requires a bare infinitive, "depend". So, "depend" is the verb, "does" is an auxiliary in this context.

Does it answer your question?

Yes, thanks alot. But I am not so sure what's mean of the conjugated verb? There is not much explaination on the web, so would you mind explain a bit further in here?

Uh...

When you conjugate a verb, you want a subject

In a positive sentence/clause, the verb agrees with the subject - keeping in mind the/any tenses requirements.

In a negative sentence/clause, you get this pattern: S + Aux not (+ rest of the verb) (+ Complements)

In a question, you get this pattern: (Interrogative word) Aux + S + rest of the verb + (Complements=
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Anonymous:
verb agrees with the subject. with that concept we should write " All now depends on .... Or "All now depend on.."
keeping in mind "all" is plural? please answer.
Anonymous:
Let me give you some context:

Let's say Brian is competing for the great country of Grammarland in the Olympics. If Brian wins his race, then he will be a hero to all Grammarlandians. In this case, "All now DEPEND on Brian." This means, All (of the Grammarladians) depend on Brian. The "of the Grammarlandians" is implied and makes the subject singular because we are grouping every Grammarlandian together as a singular unit--THE Grammarlandians. If the subject is singular, than the verb is singular.

However, let's say we were trying to convey that the results of the race are under Brian's control. Then, we would say "All now depends on Brian." In this case the implied phrase behind ALL is "the results." Results are plural; therefore, the verb must be plural. Another way to phrase this would be, "It all now depends on Brian."

All is not often used as a subject. Usually, if you are using all as the subject there is an IMPLIED subject that you have already referenced. This is because all is not a noun, it is a adjective used to describe a noun. You CAN occasionally use it as a noun, and people will typically be able to recognize what you mean.
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