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Is there such a use? If yes, why do you use it instead of "despite the fact that"? If no, what about these sentences?

- Only touch screen navigation, no spot light : despite of the fact that it shoot better without it than others

nytimes.com

- Despite of the fact that you listen their music or not, there are some things that are eternal, which is obvious in this case.

bbc.co.uk

- Somebody who has yet to pack it in is Howard Dean. He is defiantly staying in this race, despite of the fact that he's done poorly just about everywhere.

cnn.com
Contributing Member1,039
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despite

Function: preposition
Etymology: (in) despite (of)
: without deterrence or prevention by : NOTWITHSTANDING : without being blocked, balked, or thwarted by : in spite of <he managed to hold his position until retirement despite failing health> <privateers were fitted out in American ports despite official opposition -- D.G.Munro> <generous despite their own economic troubles -- Arthur Rucker>

M-W unabridged
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As you can see even from etymology above, (of) was present there, at least optionally.

I guess it's optional, but Garner recommends just "despite" instead of "in spite of,"
thus you may be right
Veteran Member11,673
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Hi,

I'd say either

In spite of the fact that it rained . . . / In spite of the rain . . .

or Despite the fact that it rained . . . / Despite the rain . . .

I'd consider 'In despite of' to be incorrect.

Best wishes, Clive
Veteran Member69,521
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You can't assume that quotes you drag off the internet from sites such as the bbc or newspapers are written by journalists or are going to be correct English. Anyone can write something that appears on the internet and a lot of people will make mistakes, whether they are native speakers with poor English, or English learners.

For example, your bbc.co.uk quoted use was just from a comments forum, where anyone can post their opinions of the band Queen, and nothing to do with journalists at all. In fact the writer is from Croatia and his post shows that he has a few problems with English. He gets his point across just fine, but there are errors, including the 'despite of the fact that'.

"I can't believe that there are still some idiots that try to detract Queen's achievement. Despite of the fact that you listen their music or not, there are some things that are eternal, which is obvious in this case. Whether you like them or not, there is no place for discussion of their musical abilities. As a musician myself, I'm in position to say those things.
Marko.. Croatia"

The NY Times quote is again from a users forum. Another sentence by the same person reads "Shhoting pictures with less resolutions than it writes on mini DV". Would you now assume that is correct English just because it is on the internet?
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Anonymous:
Nona The BritWould you now assume that is correct English just because it is on the internet?
No, I just thought those sites would be careful with the way they used the language and I think I am mistaken. By the way, thank you for your helpful insights.
sorry anon, I didn't mean to sound so cross about it. But surely when you found those examples you could see that they were just forum comments, nothing 'officially' BBC etc?

We live and learn eh!Emotion: smile
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Anonymous:
'Despite of" is absolutely correct!
Hi,

Thank you for the comment.

Can you discuss with us a little more why you hold this opinion?

Best wishes, Clive
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Anonymous'Despite of" is absolutely correct!
Hello Anon,

Some people use 'despite' instead of ' in spite of ' because the former is shorter. However, " 'despite of' is not the same as 'in spite of '," said my teacher and he added, " 'despite of ' as part of the phrase 'in despite of' means 'in defiance of ' ."

Best,
Hoa Thai
Contributing Member1,100
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