Can someone clear up when to use "have" and when "did"
cause i'm always doubtful when to use "have" and "did"

For example: Why haven't you said it earlier
while Why didn't you said it ealier sounds perfectly right?

english is confusing i know.

Tomer.
Full Member191
TomerCan someone clear up when to use "have" and when "did"
cause i'm always doubtful when to use "have" and "did"

For example: Why haven't you said it earlier?
while Why didn't you said it ealier sounds perfectly right?
Why haven't you said it earlier?

When we use 'has' or 'have', the following verb has to be a past participle.

For example, We have eaten. ('eaten' is a past participle)

eat ate eaten

Why didn't you say (not 'said') it earlier?

When we use "did' or "didn't", the following verb must be one in the simple present tense.

say said said
Veteran Member8,069
Hello Tomer,

Liat's explanation was very clear, I'm convinced that you'll find it neat and easy to comprehend.
If you do feel that you're in need of more help, don't hesitate to post new threads or contact me personally(ICQ: 133465992).
Liat, does the word 'earlier' imply a definite time?

I/You/They/We/She/He/It + didn't + a present simple verb

I didn't eat(not ate)
She didn't drink(not drank)
They didn't look(not looked)


Welcome abroad, ach sheli!

P.S
Liat, thank you very much for your comma-splice explanation, it was fantastic.
Full Member393
"Why haven't you said it earlier?" = Present Perfect

The Present Perfect Form:
Subject + have / has + past participle

> affermative
Have / Has + subject + past participle

> interrogative
Subject + have / has + not + past participle == > negative

Present Perfect usage:
- Past actions with results in the present (I've already eaten dinner)
- Unfinished actions, action still in progress (He's lived in London for 10 years)

_______________________________________________________________

"Why didn't you say (not "said") it ealier sounds perfectly right?" = Simple past

The Simple Past Form:
Subject + past of the verb

> affermative (You called Debbie)
Did + subject + infintive

> interrogative (Did you call Debbie?)
Subject + did + not + infinitive == > negative (You didn't call Debbie)

Simple Past usage:
Use the Simple Past to express the idea that an action started and finished at a specific time in the past. Sometimes, the speaker may not actually mention the specific time, but they do have one specific time in mind.

Ex. I finished work, walked to the beach, and found a nice place to swim
Regular Member713
"WesternAmerican"
Liat, does the word 'earlier' imply a definite time?

Liat, does the word 'earlier' imply a definite time? No, it means 'before'. For example, I posted twice. The first post is my earlier post.
Anonymous:
haha toda :-) thanks for the offer of contacting your personally - definitely will make use of it as soon as i have some questions Emotion: smile thanks
Anonymous:
Why didn't you said in incorrect. You must use the first form of the verb: Why didn't you say that earlier? If the answer has any connection with the present, you use present perfect tense: Why haven't you said it earlier?
Anonymous:
when a speaker is referring his explanation of a predicative upon an object or incident in the forepast, what resolves of it??

James is my speaker. He is telling mason- a friend of his, a story. There is a causal relationship between his actions in the nearer past and those which he is relating here. He is then reporting
"... I did not understood but am glad to assure you that I lately could understand."
The verb to understand is used here twice in the past and both related to the same consequence (term).
Is this erroneous?
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