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Hello everyone,
 
I am confused about the terms 'afternoon' and 'evening'. 
 
After checking online, I have found the following definitions:
   - afternoon = the time from noon until evening.
   - evening = the time from noon until sunset. 
So logically it would be noon - afternoon - evening - sunset
The part where I am confused is that afternoon and evening start from noon.  
I could say "It's 1 hour in the evening" which would mean the same as "It's 1 hour in the afternoon".
 
I do not understand this concept fully.
 
Thanks,
 
--
uEnglish
New Member03
Anonymous:
Hi,

My Oxford dictionnary states the following:

Evening: The end part of the day, esp. from about 6pm, or sunset if earlier, to bedtime.

Therefore, you can logically assume that : noon, afternoon, evening, (sunset), night.

Hope it helps!
Hi,
I am confused about the terms 'afternoon' and 'evening'. 
 
After checking online, I have found the following definitions:
   - afternoon = the time from noon until evening.
   - evening = the time from noon until sunset. <<< This definition is incorrect.
A better definition is eg from about 6 pm (or sunset) until bedtime.
So logically it would be noon - afternoon - evening - sunset
The part where I am confused is that afternoon and evening start from noon.  
I could say "It's 1 hour in the evening" which would mean the same as "It's 1 hour in the afternoon".
 
I do not understand this concept fully.

Clive
Veteran Member69,355
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Thank you Clive and Anonymous.

So a particular definition here is incorrect?

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/evening
5.
dialect ( Southern US ), ( Brit ) the period between noon and sunset
Hi,

Your link temporarily does not work when I click on it.

However, I see that your definition says 'dialect (Southern US), (Brit)'.

Maybe they use that meaning in parts of the Southern US. I don't know.

I'm British, and I've never heard it used with that meaning.

Anyway, 'dialect' suggests 'local meaning only, not the standard meaning'.

Clive
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Teachers: Users in this role are certified teachers. This may include DELTA, CELTA, TESOL, TEFL qualified professionals. Email a scan of your qualification to an admin, if you wish to be considered.
uEnglish

Hello everyone,

I am confused about the terms 'afternoon' and 'evening'.

After checking online, I have found the following definitions:
- afternoon = the time from noon until evening.
- evening = the time from noon until sunset.
So logically it would be noon - afternoon - evening - sunset
The part where I am confused is that afternoon and evening start from noon.
I could say "It's 1 hour in the evening" which would mean the same as "It's 1 hour in the afternoon".

I do not understand this concept fully.

Thanks,

--
uEnglish
You would say, "It's 1 in the afternoon".

Typically, "hour" would be used to talk about a starting and ending time period.

"Afternoon" is usually used for 1pm-4 or 5pm (light)

"Evening" is the period after that. (light or dark)

"Night" is the period after the sun goes down, typically. Reserved for zero light. (dark)
Full Member128
Maybe a spontaneous guess, but could the etymology of 'night' possibly be the negation of 'light' (n(o) (l)ight)?
uEnglishMaybe a spontaneous guess, but could the etymology of 'night' possibly be the negation of 'light' (n(o) (l)ight)?
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Proto-Germanic/nahts

Beowulf used "daeges and nihtes".

It looks like it would take awhile to follow that trail...
Anonymous:
The term afternoon relates to specific clock times, after noon (12 pm) until around 5. or 6 pm.
It does not relate to daylight or sunset at all as in mid winter in the British Isles the sun may set around 4 pm or earlier, so it could be fully dark yet still be afternoon.
Neither does it relate specifically to mealtimes as different social groups eat at different times, some have the last meal of the day around 5 pm and some around 8 pm.
Its a cultural or social term without a legal definition.
I am English and live in England.
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