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Anonymous:
Thesis and dissertation are two facets of academic research; the former leading to a PhD and the latter to a Master’s degree like MPhil. Difference between thesis and dissertation
Anonymous:
One writes a thesis in some three months time, while a dissertation needs four years!!!! If this suggests any difference to anyone! Emotion: wink
Anonymous:
I would suggest that a thesis is a theoretical hypotheses according to which you would undertake research to prove the theory - the research purpose is specific to the theoretical hypothes. A disertation is a review and analysis according to a particular perspective which serves to advance the 'existing' accepted theories or extent of knowledge. for instance a would be doctor of knowledge in a certin area might undertake field and desk research to explain why a disease develops in a certain way and to better inform understanding of the nature of the disease. If your disertation does not have a theoretical hypoteses it is not a thesis no matter how high your academic qualification being sought. You can write a disertation for anything, its simply drawing together different sources of knowledge and interpreting it via reason, third party knowledge or research, to advance the existing knowledge in doing so. For a PhD disertation you're disertation is required to demonstrate an ability to draw together a significant wealth of knowledge and give a considered perspective supported by your field or desk research.
Anonymous:
Thesis is somthing which based on primary data collection whereas dissertation is more likely based uopn secondary data collection.
Anonymous:
This is exactly right, well played
Anonymous:
I hate to tell you this but you are being narrow minded - this is the case yes in the USA, but not in Britain. Which for arguments sake has the original education system of which America has adapted for their use. And since it seems you are looking for a definitive answer I would go with Britain.... Since they invented the system after all.
Anonymous:
AnonymousI hate to tell you this, but you are wrong. A thesis is required for a lower degree such as a Bachelors or perhaps a Masters degree. One does not complete original research for a thesis. It is a much shorter written body of work. A dissertation is a much more involved body of research that requires original research. Also, a dissertation must be defended and approved and reviewed by the doctoral candidate's committee selected by the candidate.
Careful saying that they are wrong...

I completed my MASc in Engineering. I completed, and defended, my thesis. I have also recently completed, and defended, my PhD thesis (...in Micro Robotics).

Generally, a Master's degree requires supervised research, but the research does not have to be original work. A PhD is considered unsupervised research (...although you always have a supervisor looking over your shoulder...) but needs to be original work. For comparison: my Master's thesis was about 120 pages and took 2 years. My PhD thesis was about 260 pages and took 5 years. Ouch.

The words dissertation and thesis are more often than not "regional conventions". The specific degree, and location/country/University, may dictate whether or not it's referred to as a thesis or dissertation.

In my opinion, an Engineering or Science degree (Master's or PhD) would more likely use the term Thesis, where as an Arts Degree (Master's or PhD) would more likely use the term dissertation.

But there is no fixed answer, and the two terms can be interchanged quite easily (as seen from all of these posts).

:-)
Anonymous:
If you have not already found the answer I would recommend visiting this site: http://www.doctoralnet.com/writeagooddissertationThey explain that the main difference between a dissertation and a thesis depends on what country you live in. Some countries call it a dissertation and some countries call it a thesis. But it is generally the same thing. However, this is only the case in higher learning i.e college. If you are lower in the education process a thesis can be the introduction to a paper. Hope this helps!
Anonymous:
Maybe in the US...
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