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Hello there,

Could anyone please let me know the exact difference between "On" and "Over" and "up"? I tried to consut an online dictionary. However, could not understand exactly as to what they meant.

Thanks and regards
New Member16
Hi,
This is a very broad question to seek an exact answer to. All three words can be used in many different ways. For example, the definition of 'on' in my dictionary takes almost half a page

The best thing is for you to try to write some sentences, and then post them for our comments. That way, we can see what kind of help you seem to need.

Best wishes, Clive
Veteran Member69,516
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Hello Clive,

Thank you for the quick reply. I really appreciate it. Following are the confusing sentences to me.

"The fox is running over the mat" why not 'on'
"The pig is running on the table" why not 'over'
"How many cats up the tree?" Why can't we use 'on'
'The cat is playing on the car' Why not use 'over'
'The cowboy is skipping on the van' why not 'over'

Thanks again for your big help.

Toda97
Hi,
Thank you for the quick reply. I really appreciate it. Following are the confusing sentences to me.

"The fox is running over the mat" why not 'on'
'Over' suggests from one side to the other, ie get on at one side, run across , get off at the other side. 'On' does not suggest this.

"The pig is running on the table" why not 'over'
See the comment above.

"How many cats are up the tree?" Why can't we use 'on'
You could say 'on'. 'Up' stresses the idea that they are qute high.

'The cat is playing on the car' Why not use 'over'
See my comment above about 'over'. It sounds here like the cat is not interested in getting off the car.

The cowboy is skipping on the van' why not 'over'
As noted above, it depends what you mean. In this example, I don't know what you mean. The image of a cowboy skipping on a van all seems rather incongruous to me.

Best wishes, Clive
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Anonymous:
Hi!
I would like to know if I'll be using over or on in this sentence...
Since, I have you (over on) the phone.... or
Since, I have you (over on) the line.....
thanks!
Anonymous Hi!
I would like to know if I'll be using over or on in this sentence...
Since, I have you (over on) the phone.... or
Since, I have you (over on) the line.....
thanks!

On the phone, on the line.
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Anonymous:
Hi All ,



As per my understanding on is used where you touch the surface whereas over is used where surface is not touched.

Anonymous:
I think its,.Over the phone,..and On the line..
If you say "Since I have you over the phone," as the example asked, people would think you are speaking an interesting version of English.
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