Hello!
Could you tell me what differences are between "located" and "situated"? If there are 2 words so there should be 2 differences, am I right? Please, explain!
Who knows origins of these words?
   Thank you!
New Member09
OceanataliaIf there are 2 words so there should be 2 differences, am I right?
No. That means that if there are five words there should be five differences. Emotion: smile

situated is simply a higher-register word than located. situated tends to sound more formal; located, more casual.

CJ
Veteran Member53,291
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what about slight flavours?Emotion: smile
Oceanataliawhat about slight flavours?

I don't understand what you mean.

CJ
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I mean:
    1. are they both English words or American?
    2. are they archaisms?
    3.could you explain more detailed, cause simetimes it's difficult to understand for those who aren't native speakers.

   Thank you for understanding!
Both words are used in all varieties of English, whether British or American.
They are not archaisms. They are both used in modern English.

I don't think there is much more that I can explain. You can use either word.

The hotel is located just one block north of the post office. (Sounds like ordinary, everyday, conversational English)
The hotel is situated just one block north of the post office. (Sounds more formal. Maybe this is written in a travel brochure. Or perhaps it's being said by a man wearing a tuxedo!)

CJ
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Thanks a lot for your help! It's clear.
Anonymous:
You don't need either. Any sentence using 'situated in' or 'located in' will make perfect sense if you just say 'in' eg 'The hotel is situated near the train station which is located in the centre of town.' = 'The hotel is near the train station in the centre of town.' No one uses these words in spoken English.

As to meaning, 'situated' implies a strategic or deliberate placement ie it has a reason eg 'London is situated at the first crossing place on the River Thames' (so the Romans could guard the crossing), 'The hotel is situated near the train station' (so it gets business from travellers). 'Located' is a geographic placement: 'Greenwich Park is located in London' or 'Paris is located in the north of France'. Again, you will note 'situated' and 'located' are redundant.

'Placed' is similar to 'situated' and equally redundant imho.

Estate agents love these words: ' The Flat is situated in Docklands which is located in EC3' = 'The flat is in Docklands, EC3'.
Anonymous:
thanksEmotion: big smile
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