"differently from" or "differently than"?

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Patrick D.:
For example, "I think differently than/from other people."

"Than" or "from" or something else?
Also, what about "They give it for free, with the stipulation that I allow others to freely access and modify it."
Is the phrasing of this sentence correct?
TIA
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Michael West:
[nq:1]For example, "I think differently than/from other people." "Than" or "from" or something else?[/nq]
Both are correct, though "different than" is deprecated in some circles (and so, by extension, is "differently than".)

Nobody would have any problem with "I think differently than other people do", but this may mean something different from what you intend, which is probably
more like "I think differently from what other people think".
One say your thinking process is different, the
other says what you think is different.
[nq:1]Also, what about "They give it for free, with the stipulation that I allow others to freely access and modify it." Is the phrasing of this sentence correct?[/nq]
The grammar seems sound to me.

Michael West
Melbourne, Australia
(Expat Yank)
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John O'Flaherty:
[nq:1]For example, "I think differently than/from other people." "Than" or "from" or something else?[/nq]
Either one sounds ok.
Also 'differently to', but that is chiefly British, according to AHD.
[nq:1]Also, what about "They give it for free, with the stipulation that I allow others to freely access and modify it." Is the phrasing of this sentence correct?[/nq]
It sounds alright, but it seems to change from a generic statement to one about you in particular.
Two restatements without that flaw would be

1.They give it for free, with the stipulation that the recipient allowothers to freely access and modify it.
2.They gave it to me for free, with the stipulation that I allowothers to freely access and modify it.

john
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Patrick D.:
[nq:2]For example, "I think differently than/from other people." "Than" or "from" or something else?[/nq]
[nq:1]Either one sounds ok. Also 'differently to', but that is chiefly British, according to AHD.[/nq]
OK thanks. They both sounded a bit weird to my ear, but that's alright.
[nq:2]Also, what about "They give it for free, with the ... and modify it." Is the phrasing of this sentence correct?[/nq]
[nq:1]It sounds alright, but it seems to change from a generic statement to one about you in particular. Two restatements ... 2.They gave it to me for free, with the stipulation that I allow others to freely access and modify it.[/nq]
Sorry, I was short-sightedly typing and didn't realize that I really meant #2, but didn't write that.
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Alison:
[nq:1]For example, "I think differently than/from other people." "Than" or "from" or something else?[/nq]
The use of "than" is incorrect in BrE, but seems to be the primary usage in AmE. "From" is preferred in BrE, although you do hear "to" sometimes.
I was taught "one differs from, but is compared to".
[nq:1]Also, what about "They give it for free, with the stipulation that I allow others to freely access and modify it." Is the phrasing of this sentence correct?[/nq]
Strictly, I'd have thought "they give it for nothing" or "give it free" was more grammatically correct, although the "for free" construction is often used.

Alison
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