Do you Capitalize "sir" and "Madam" in dialogue?

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elanders:
"Yes, I believe so, Madam."
or
"Yes, I believe so, madam?"
"Yes, I believe you're correct, sir."
or
"Yes, I believe you're correct, Sir."
The dialogue appears in a novel

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Eric Walker:
[nq:1]"Yes, I believe so, Madam." or "Yes, I believe so, madam?" "Yes, I believe you're correct, sir." or "Yes, I believe you're correct, Sir." The dialogue appears in a novel[/nq]
While there are few hard and fast rules, The Chicago Manual of Style (14th) says, at 7.27 ("Honorific Titles") , not so: the examples include "my lord", "sir", and "madam".
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Pcresswell:
[nq:1]"Yes, I believe so, Madam." or "Yes, I believe so, madam?" "Yes, I believe you're correct, sir." or "Yes, I believe you're correct, Sir." The dialogue appears in a novel Riclanders Dot Comhttp://riclanders.com/[/nq]
I would not capitalise, for any title that I can think of.
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Eric Walker:
[nq:1]I would not capitalise, for any title that I can think of.[/nq]
Generally, if the title is associated with or used in place of a proper name, it would be capitalized; here are some examples from The Chicago :
General Eisenhower
President Buchanan
Prince Charles
Cardinal Newman

C. R. Dodwell, Fellow and Librarian of Trinity College
You did well, Captain, to avoid that sea lane.
Ladies and gentlemen, the President of the United States.

A peculiar exception they note there is the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United States presumably to avoid confusion with someone who happened to be orating there. Other such exceptions are General of the Army, Fleet Admiral, and some British titles (the Prince of Wales, the Queen Mother, the Princess Royal, and the Dame of Sark (look that one up some time).
Honorifics are normally capitalized: Her Majesty, Your Grace, Your Honor. Some epithets are also tradirtionally capitalized: the Great Emancipator, the Wizard of Menlo Park, Babe Ruth, Stonewall Jackson (arguably those are proper names), the Sun King, and a few others of that sort.
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elanders:
[nq:2]I would not capitalise, for any title that I can think of.[/nq]
[nq:1]Generally, if the title is associated with or used in place of a proper name, it would be capitalized; here ... Park, Babe Ruth, Stonewall Jackson (arguably those are proper names), the Sun King, and a few others of that sort.[/nq]
A little confusing.
Ok, in my manuscript I talk of Kings, Queens, Princesses and Dukes.

If I write, "The princess said she'd be there" is the ruling saying "princess" should be capital because I'm talking about a specific princess?

Likewise, duke?
EG

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