Don't give me what I asked for, give me what I need.?

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Don't give me what I asked for, give me what I need.

Does this mean when trying to meet someone's request/need one should keep in mind that what they would be able to handle/understand easily? Please tell me.
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It means the person may be bad at articulating their needs. You need to think beyond what their words say that they want, and look at what will really be of help to them.

If someone comes to me and says "I need a brochure" I need to talk to them to understand what audience they are trying to reach, and what they need to say. We may decide a brochure isn't what is needed, but instead, I help them come up with a presentation to make to that potential client in person. A brochure isn't what they need, even though it's what they asked for.
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It means that if what I ask for is not appropriate, offer what is needed instead. Maybe a person asks for a permit to New York, but when asked about it, it becomes clear what he needs is something different. like a ticket or a passport. Sometimes people respond by asking, "You need a ticket, right?" Or maybe the clarifying question is, "Do you need a passport?"
New Member30
Maybe a person asks for a permit to New York
What that permit is all about? Is it a work permit? Or, what? Please tell me.
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Here's an update:

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Don't give me what I ask for, give me what I need.

Let's look at the situation in terms of a passport instead of a ticket. A passport is a kind of permission to enter a country, but maybe the question is really about a work permit. The listener has to find out what is meant by permission, so he asks if it means a work permit or a passport. If it is a passport, he tells how to get one. If it is a work permit the other person needs, he tells where to go to find out about that, if one is needed. No native speaker would say "a permission" since " "permission" is a non-countable word. So we say, "I need permission" instead of "I need a permission." So a permit or some other kind of permission like a passport is probably what the person needs. If you ask for permission, (not a permission) to go somewhere, you would say "I need permission" to someone like a boss who would say "yes" or "no."

Other words that are not countable are "advice" and "information." They use "some" instead of "a." So we say "I need some advice" or "some information", not I need "an advice" or "an information."

I hope this helps.

Re: Don't give me what I asked for, give me what I need.

By Jackson6612 in Basic English Grammar Questions


Maybe a person asks for a permit to New York”
What that permit is all about? Is it a work permit? Or, what? Please tell me.


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