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Hai all,

Is there any significant difference between the following statements?

1. We should take the alternative route due to bad road condition.

2. We should take the alternative route owing to bad road condition.

Thanks,

SRI
New Member50
There is no difference in intended meaning, but please see Due to.

Hi should be spelled so.
Veteran Member92,236
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Thanks Mr. MM
Anonymous:
There actually is a difference between owing to and due to:

Owing to is adverbial
Example: "The match was postponed owing to the rain."

As 'Owing to' is adverbial, it refers to the verb 'postponed'. If you used the adjectival 'due to' it would have to refer to a noun, in this case the match - but the match was not due to the rain!

Due to is adjectival
Example: "There was an increase in the man's temper due to the poor English."

There is a noun 'increase' so that 'due to' can be properly used (it is adjectival, always referring back to a noun).
Merriam-Webster and Oxford both describe "owing to" as a preposition, Anon. It consists of the adjective "owing" + the preposition "to". It means "because of".

(We can say the same of "due to".)

MrP
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S_s_sridharHai all,

Is there any significant difference between the following statements?

1. We should take the alternative route due to bad road condition.

2. We should take the alternative route owing to bad road condition.

Thanks,

SRI

I don't know what it is but somehow both sounded odd to me. Perhaps, "due to" and "owing" have an implied tone of the past.

I would say: 1) We took the alternate route due to bad road condition.

2) Owing to the bad weather, we had to take the alternate route.
Senior Member3,816
Anonymous:
Perhaps it is the singular condition that is odd. I would have advised bad road conditions if I hadn't been distracted by the original underescoring.

('S me. -- MM)
Anonymous:
Definitely "owing to"
Anonymous:
Due to means "caused by"
Owing to means "because of"
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