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Hi all

It would be interesting to hear from nonnative speakers of English in particular what influence English exerts on other languages nowadays. What English words and expressions are used in your language? Does English grammar or syntax have an influence on your native language? Where is this influence seen or heard? Books? Journalese? Advertising? Conversation?

Are Anglicisms frowned upon in your language or generally accepted? Of course I welcome replies from native speakers as well, anything you think worth mentioning.

English and Finnish are not related and thus the idea of English grammar exercising an influence on Finnish grammar is all but inconceivable. In advertising, some English expressions are commonly used, for example happy hour is often seen in bars and pubs and some people use it even when they speak Finnish.

Café is the word often seen outside coffee houses or cafeterias, but no one uses the word when they speak Finnish. Finnish is a highly inflected language and café just doesn't lend itself easily to our inflection patterns, which may be the reason people never use the word in conversation.

Some yongsters have adopted the non-Finnish way to read decimals: two point five. I don't mean they say it in English, they just use the Finnish word for point, which is incorrect in Finnish. We don't have a decimal point, we have a decimal comma (2,5). Pocket calculators and computer programmes are probably chiefly to blame for this phenomenon.

There is at least one Finnish Eurosport tennis commentator who uses the English word order when he says thirty all. In Finnish the numeral should come last.

If I realise I have forgotten something important, I'll write another post later. Meanwhile, I'm looking forward to your contributions.
Thank you.

CB
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German is extrelemy influenced by English nowadays. English replaces German words, like: cool, managment, up to date, meeting, downloaden, Sorry, and really lots more. It even has a certain impact on our grammar, for example: Das macht Sinn ( That makes sense )

If you are interested in the influence of English, check out what is does to German.... there will be heaps of stuff you can read
Full Member108
Case Assigner is quite right.
Jobs for example are as longer as possible written in English way. Furthermore scientific words are no longer translated.

online
harddisc
flatscreen
...
Regular Member767
Hi,
this thread is so interesting, I could write for days about the "hilarious" situation in Italy. Italian is extremely infuenced by English. Let's start...
Well, in Italian most words related to IT and technology are English words. Mouse, monitor, computer, home theatre, player, file, directory, browser, client, server, click, on-line, call center, chat room, e-mail, account, display, ect. are the same, but keyboard is "tastiera", and cell phone is "cellulare", for example. English words are the standard and only terms for most of this stuff.
There are a lot of other words, for example show, reality show, show girl, spray, either bar or pub (where you drink), Champions League (once said in Italian "Coppa dei campioni", now it's said in English), camper, station-wagon, DJ, flirt, fashion... Even these are the common standard way to refer to that stuff.
Despite all those English words, Italians don't know much English, they just pretend to know it. They want to sound "cool" and use English terms for everything (and often incorrect terms). For example, it's extremely common to find "free drink", "main room", "special guest", "pass", "topless bar/pub", "party", "house music", "happy hour"... and similar terms. At parties or night clubs often there are speakers that start to talk in English, so they sound "cool" to the others... to me they sound ridiculous, hahaha, they make me laugh every time, they have no clue how to pronounce any word in English.

Well, I think there would be a lot more to say, I'll post something else another time, maybe. Emotion: smile
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Hello!
Very relevant!! I'm afraid that most non-native speakers' speech is eventually influenced by the language they learn. Personally, I can say that both Russians and Estonians use a lot, and I mean a real LOT of English words.....this situation is rather sad, since these words can be happily substituted with those of Russian/Estonian origin. I mean such words as "management", "creativity", etc. But it's not, lets say, popular. Code switching is also present. I cannot really say how others react but I dislike it.
New Member16
Kooyeen... to me they sound ridiculous, hahaha, they make me laugh every time, they have no clue how to pronounce any word in English.
hehe Kooyeen is right! Emotion: big smile

I would like to add that sometimes they seem ridiculous because they want to speak English at any cost even when it's not an English word.
For example: the word 'plus' is Latin, so it must be pronounced as 'pl-oo-s', at least in Italy! Most people pronounce it in the English way, because they really think it's an English word or simply that the English pronounciation is better Emotion: big smile
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FrancescaFor example: the word 'plus' is Latin, so it must be pronounced as 'pl-oo-s', at least in Italy! Most people pronounce it in the English way, because they really think it's an English word or simply that the English pronounciation is better Emotion: big smile
Hi Francesca

Most interesting! As I am not a spring chicken any more, I don't necessarily have knowledge of all the English words teenagers use, but I assure you I have never hear a Finn say plusin the English way when speaking Finnish.Emotion: smile We have the same Latin word and the Latin pronunciation.

I think one grammatical phenomenon deserves being mentioned here. In Finnish the personal pronouns are always used in a very exact way; in other words, you refers to the person who is being spoken to and cannot be used in a general sense. Sentences like you never know what will happen are incorrect unless you really means the person standing in front of you.

In spoken Finnish, however, especially young people have begun to use you in the English way. This is quite perplexing because there is no need for it. There is an even shorter way to say such things in Finnish: one can use the third person singular form of the verb without a subject. This is not possible in English, but if it were, we would have sentences like this:

Never knows what may happen.
Shouldn't do such things.
If eats too much, puts on weight.


Even though there is no grammatical inadequacy, this English use of the second person singular is spreading like wildfire. English grammar has not altered Finnish grammatical structures, but some youngsters have adopted an inexact English way to use a Finnish personal pronoun.

Some people call it 'the Häkkinen passive' after Formula One driver Mika Häkkinen, who was good at the wheel but languages were not his forte -- not even the Finnish language.Emotion: smile Häkkinen is not the originator of this awkward construction, though, he just used it a lot.

Finns realise that Finnish is not under threat and have not resorted to such rather extreme measures as the French. In 1994 a law was passed in France which meant that the use of foreign terms for example in advertising could result in a thousand dollar fine. And a dictionary containing 3,500 French words to replace English words was published in the 1990s.

The French Academy has done a good job of standardising the spelling and defending the French language. The French may sympathise with the purpose of the Academy's efforts but English words are likely to stay in use.
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Trusted Users: Trusted users are allowed to use additional capabilities of the site such as private messaging to all users and various other advanced features. You cannot join this role unless you are promoted by an administrator.
Cool BreezeSome people call it 'the Häkkinen passive' after Formula One driver Mika Häkkinen, who was good at the wheel but languages were not his forte -- not even the Finnish language.Emotion: smile Häkkinen is not the originator of this awkward construction, though, he just used it a lot.

That's funny because you can say the same about Totti: great at kicking balls but very very bad at speaking Italian...I can't think about him speaking English Emotion: tongue tied

Anyway thanks for the interesting details about Finnish language Emotion: smile

Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
In spanish, you can see the influence of english in a lot of sport terms. Fútbol and basketbol are the spanish equivalents of football and basketball.

There are words in other areas that have been changed very slightly from english, for example the spanish word estandar is an alteration from standard

There are also a series of very commonly used words, like hobby, parking, hippy, .. they're are written in spanish the same way than in english.

Then there are new words that have entered in the last years very strongly in the vocabulary, a very clear example are the words freak and freaky, that are used to design a person who is very strange.
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