English translation of French diploma "DUT"

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freeposte:
Hello dear members of the uk.culture.language.english newsgroup. I need Your kindly help today. Do You know the english translation for the french diplome "DUT" wich means Diplôme Universitaire Technologique acquired over two successfull years of "IUT" university (IUT for Institut Universitaire Technologique).
Many Thanks
Octavio
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arachedeux:
[nq:1]Hello dear members of the uk.culture.language.english newsgroup. I needYour kindly help today. Do You know the english translation for the french diplome "DUT" wich means Diplôme Universitaire Technologique[/nq]
I'd suggest "University of Technology Diploma", you should find a tutor to also find out what the equivalent might be in whichever English speaking country you're thinking of.
[nq:1]acquired over two successfull years of "IUT" university (IUT for Institut Universitaire Technologique).[/nq]
I'd suggest "University of Technology".
I'd follow both with the original French titles in full in brackets. Bon Chance!
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Dave Fawthrop:
[nq:1]Hello dear members of the uk.culture.language.english newsgroup. I need Your kindly help today. Do You know the english translation for the french diplome "DUT" wich means Diplôme Universitaire Technologique acquired over two successfull years of "IUT" university (IUT for Institut Universitaire Technologique).[/nq]
The English* and French educational sytstms are very different. It is likely that there is no directly equivalent *qualification in England, thus you are left with translating the words only, which will result in a meaningless English phrase.
Dave F
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Matthew Huntbach:
[nq:1]Hello dear members of the uk.culture.language.english newsgroup. I need Your kindly help today. Do You know the english translation for the french diplome "DUT" wich means Dipl?me Universitaire Technologique acquired over two successfull years of "IUT" university (IUT for Institut Universitaire Technologique).[/nq]
The closest equivalent in the English education system would be the HND (Higher National Diploma).
However, if you're compiling a CV or similar, standard practice is to refer to formal qualifications in their own language, and not attempt either a direct English translation or even worse to use the name of a similar qualification in the English system.
I deal with university applications, and quite often I come across applicants who claim to have "A-levels", the standard English pre-university qualification, but what they actually mean by this is the pre-university qualification of their own country. In using the word "A-level" these people are claiming wrongly to have a particular qualification whose standards I am well aware of, rather than a qualification which may be similar but whose standards cannot be guaranteed to be the same. Strictly, in using this word they are claiming to have qualifications they do not have i.e. UK ones, and so are making fraudulent university applications. Mostly I can see this is not intended, but it's far easier for me if they just use the official name of the qualification in their own country, then it's clear what they mean.
Matthew Huntbach
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arachedeux:
[nq:2]Hello dear members of the uk.culture.language.english newsgroup. I needYour kindly ... two successfull years of "IUT" university (IUT for InstitutUniversitaire Technologique).[/nq]
[nq:1]The closest equivalent in the English education system would be the HND (Higher National Diploma). However, if you're compiling a ... me if they just use the official name of the qualification in their own country, then it'sclear what they mean.[/nq]
Very illuminating. Isn't there an agreed table of relativity between qualifications?
cheers,
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Matthew Huntbach:
[nq:2]I deal with university applications, and quite often I come ... in their own country, then it's clear what they mean.[/nq]
[nq:1]Very illuminating. Isn't there an agreed table of relativity between qualifications? cheers,[/nq]
No. UCAS (the "University and Colleges Admissions Service" through which all applications to UK full time undergraduate degrees must go) publishes a comprehensive account of overseas qualifications:
http://www.ucas.com/candq/inter/index.html
but doesn't attempt to provide a formal table of relativity.

There has been an attempt to introduce such a table for UK qualifications, but as an admissions tutor, I prefer the situation where I am permitted to use my own judgement. Just because some bureaucrat somewhere says "qualification X is equivalent to qualification Y" doesn't mean I should be forced to agree when it may be my own experience, at least for my own subject, that qualification X is very much inferior to qualification Y. Obviously it would be even more difficult to draw up something similar for all the qualifications that exist across the world. I'm happy to use guidelines such as that provided by UCAS, but an "agreed table of relativity" rather than informal guidelines suggests an end to the autonomy currently enjoyed by university admissions tutors.

Matthew Huntbach
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arachedeux:
[nq:2]Very illuminating. Isn't there an agreed table of relativity between qualifications? cheers,[/nq]
[nq:1]No. UCAS (the "University and Colleges Admissions Service" through whichall applications to UK full time undergraduate degrees must go) publishes ... an "agreed table of relativity" rather than informal guidelines suggests an end to theautonomy currently enjoyed by university admissions tutors.[/nq]
I recall that proposed introduction, or rather the gathered pipes of PR that surrounded it. I'd assumed it was a done deal. I prefer the personal touch too. There's no reason to think that any two Uni departments are similar, let alone Uni's as a whole. They seem to have done a good job in increasing productivity and avoiding those endless tests and audits of lower academies. cheers,
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