even date?

27 replies
1 2 3 4
I always see "Thank you for your letter of even date", but what is the meaning of "even date"? Could anyone help me? Thank you!
New Member27
I cannot think of anything rather a letter that you receive on an even date. (A number that is even can be divided by two, of course you know that!)
Contributing Member1,384
Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
Could this be an incorrect use of 'even'. Even can mean: Constant, regular, uniform, unchanging. Do you send them a regular letter? Perhaps they meant thanks for corresponding with me so regularly, constantly - one a month like clockwork!
Veteran Member11,782
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
I think it means "of the same date", in contracts, etc. So if his letter and your reply are both dated 23rd December, they are "of even date".

MrP
Veteran Member12,806
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
MrPedanticI think it means "of the same date", in contracts, etc. So if his letter and your reply are both dated 23rd December, they are "of even date".

MrP

It is more often used in deeds and contracts than correspondence. In a letter it would be more usual to say "dated today" or "of today's date".

If you have two deeds that are going to be executed on the same day and one refers to the other you can say "by a deed of even date herewith..." It is shorter that "by a deed dated the same day as this deed". Personally I prefer the longer form as it is a little clearer.
Regular Member933
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
I think "of even date" was common enough in business correspondence, in the days of "I beg to remain", "your esteemed favour to hand", etc. Although English business people don't use these phrases any more, unless jocularly, they (and other elaborate forms) do turn up in correspondence from India, Malaysia, etc. from time to time.

MrP
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
I see.

thank you all of you.
Anonymous:
I'm a lawyer and we still use the "letter of even date" phrase instead of "dated today" when we want to confuse nonlawyers.
Anonymous:
I agree "even date" is so commonly used in the legal field. I don't use it to confuse layman, rather it is something to tell "I am in the business too".
Show more
Live chat
Registered users can join here