RE: Examples of Metaphors? page 4

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Approved answer (verified by )
Simile - a figure of speech comparing two unlike things that is often introduced by like or as (as in cheeks like roses) -- compare

Metaphor - a figure of speech in which a word or phrase literally denoting one kind of object or idea is used in place of another to suggest a likeness or analogy between them (as in drowning in money) (Webster)

Metaphor

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players
They have their exits and their entrances;

Simile

The world is like a stage
It is as if people were like actors
they come and go as though they were entering or leaving a stage.

Metaphore

"You are the sunshine of my life"

Simile

"her presence warmed the room like the sun"
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"her presence warmed the room similar to the sun"
"her presence warmed the room same as the sun"
"her presence warmed the room undifferentiated from the sun"

metaphor or simile? The only difference is literally "like"?

"her presence warmed the room like the sun"
New Member17
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Does anyone have examples of similes without "like" or "as"? The definition above stated "often" using "like" or "as".
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The basic difference between a simile and a metaphore is that a simile says that one thing is LIKE another, and a metaphore says that one thing IS another. "All the world IS a stage" Not all definitions state that similes use "like" or "as", but in reality they do.

this page might help:

http://teenwriting.about.com/library/glossary/bldef-simile.htm
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Wouldn't saying something is comparable, be the same as saying it's "like" something? Why can't you use "comparable" instead of "like" as a simile? Or does the fact you use "comparable" make the statement a metaphor? I guess what I am getting at is that simile's and metaphor sometimes appear to be the exact same thing, sans the word "like" or "as" - this is very confusing and at times does not seem logical.

"All the world is comparable to a stage"

"All the world is like a stage"

"All the world is presented as a stage"
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Approved answer (verified by )
"She really ruffled his feathers" this is a metaphor, because we are talking about a woman annoying a man - not about a woman stroking a bird.

"The moon's a balloon" is a metaphor - of cours the moon is not really a balloon

"The world is my oyster"

"She was a tigress when roused"

Similes and metaphors can be very similar, but you must remember the definition. You cannot substitute "comprable to" because you are not comparing, you are actually saying that one thing is like another.

Languages are not always logical, because they are full of idosyncratic things - like metaphors, similes, idioms and proverbs. Can you think of an idiom or saying in your language that an English speaker might not understand? Emotion: smile
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Guest:
(bah) I don't know wut a metaphor is I have homework and I don't get it.... (6)
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Here's an example of why a metaphor works, Guest, which might help you if the other material in this thread hasn't hit the spot.

Couch Potato:
Couch potato = lazy person. A lazy person buries themselves in the cushions of a couch (sofa, chesterfield, La-Z-Boy) in safe, sedentary comfort, "vegging out" mindlessly in front of the TV, eyes in a fixed, submissive stare. A couch potato never leaves the home, and cannot be motivated, having everything nearby so they never have to move. Compare this to the potato, which is buried in the comfort and providence of soil and to which the only escape from its lifestyle is death. Covered in eyes, but without a brain or muscle, the potato is snuggled and unmotivated.

A comfortable sofa is fertile soil for the couch potato.

Falderal
New Member01
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Hi guest,

have you read the whole thread? Emotion: smile
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