Examples of Metaphors?

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Anonymous:
Hi everyone,

I realise this has been spoken of a few times, but it seems some of the examples on other sites might be wrong. There was some confusion between similes and metaphors. Is it true that 'A simile compares two things using the words "like" or "as". A metaphor, on the other hand, states that something IS something.'?

Could you give me some example of metaphors ? thanks!!
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AnonymousIs it true that 'A simile compares two things using the words "like" or "as".
Yes, provided there is something extraordinary (i.e., metaphoric) about the comparison.

A llama is like a small camel.

has the right formula for a simile without being a simile, because it is completely literal.

Your remark was like a knife through my heart

is definitely a simile.
AnonymousA metaphor, on the other hand, states that something IS something.'?
That is a very common definition. Yes. But again, as above (See the 'llama' example), the mere use of that 'X is Y' formula does not make a metaphor:

A bachelor is an unmarried man

has the formula of a metaphor without being a metaphor, because it is completely literal.

The boss is a dragon.

is definitely a metaphor.

To have a metaphor you have to have a situation where speaker meaning differs from word meaning.
______________

Note: Many writers do not require this "X is Y" pattern to be present for a metaphor to be recognized, and they accept other formulations as metaphors, which may or may not be called "implied metaphors", depending on the expert you consult on the topic.

For example,

The manager shot down Tom's idea.

contains an implied metaphor: To reject an idea is to shoot it down.
_______________

See ?
See Metaphor
See METAPHOR
See Metaphor
See Metaphor Defined
See Re: Is this a metaphor?
See Metaphor
See is this a metaphor?
See Simile and metaphor
See Simile, metaphor and metonymy
See Would this count as a metaphor?

CJ
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Your explanation is correct.

"The fog comes in on little cat feet."
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for simile, A is like or as B .

First of all, what do we call as and like? I have forgot the technical term.

And what is called A and B ?

Ex. your hair is like a waterfall

What do we call hair, like and waterfall?

Thanks
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I agree with your definition for similes, but not exactly metaphor definition.
Metaphors are states that something is something, but you have to remember it's a figure of speech.

You light up my life, is an example of a metaphor, and you shouldn't take it literally.

You could just classify those poetry devices as imagery too.
New Member04
CalifJimThe manager shot down Tom's idea.

contains an implied metaphor: To reject an idea is to shoot it down.

Again, as above, the mere use of the formula does not make a metaphor.
CalifJimTo have a metaphor you have to have a situation where speaker meaning differs from word meaning.
I'm confused. If part of the formula is that the speaker's meaning must be different from the word's meaning, and it is not; then it doesn't follow the formula.

If the expression has become an idiom, and has therefore acquired a second meaning, then there can be no [implied] metaphor.

Meaning #1: The jet shot down a UFO. (no metaphor, no formula)

Meaning #2: The manager shot down Tom's idea. (No mataphor, no formula)

Perhaps what I misunderstand is your definition of "the metaphor formula."

(I won't call it "the metaphoric formula," since we seem to agree that not all things metaphoric are metaphors.)

Surely no one would say "a metaphor is a figure of speech in which the speaker says one thing is another thing. Therefore 'that dog is an animal' is a metaphor." That's absurd. Where's the formula?

A simile is not obliged to use "like" or "as," and a metaphor is not obliged to use "is."
That's rudimentary - a pons assinorum. Is that the "formula" you speak of?
Are you saying, "You're a lantern" is a metaphor, and "You light up my life" is an implied metaphor?

Best regards, - A.
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What is Tom like, I never met him?
Tom is a party animal - is a direct metaphor

An airforce jet shot down an UFO - is a reported statement

Manager shot down Tom's idea - Shot down is used to dramatize the rejection of Tom's idea. So it's a figure of speech in the form of metaphor.

I am so hungry that I could eat a horse -is a metaphor which doesn't follow the typical formulation as described by earlier posters.
Senior Member4,167
AvangiA simile is not obliged to use "like" or "as," and a metaphor is not obliged to use "is."
On the contrary, according to the definitions many students are expected to use in their class work, these figures of speech are restricted to these formulas:

An X is like a Y. (simile) [Also as, as if, as though patterns.]

An X is a Y. (metaphor) [Also other forms of be.]

These (above) are what I am referring to in my previous post when I write about "formulas". As I said, not everything that follows these formulas is a simile or metaphor. The 'llama' and the 'bachelor' examples are the illustration of this. I am trying to establish with these facts that there is more to these figures of speech than the bare formula.

Later in the post I make the further observation that the extra needed element is that speaker meaning must differ from word meaning.
AvangiIf the expression has become an idiom, and has therefore acquired a second meaning, then there can be no [implied] metaphor.
So, as far as you are concerned, "to shoot down (an idea)" is a dead metaphor. It has 'acquired a second meaning', so it's no longer an implied metaphor. That's understandable. Not everyone always agrees about the exact time a metaphor (of any kind) has become a dead metaphor.

But I don't regard it as completely dead yet! I still believe that "shoot down" has a literal meaning having to do with guns and that, since "the manager" uses no gun to shoot down the ideas, "shoot down" is not (literally) the speaker's meaning.

On the other hand, maybe I should have chosen a more dramatic example to illustrate the concept of "implied metaphor". I wonder if you would accept this as an implied metaphor:

Henry is so aggressive. He just bulldozes his way to the front of the line every time.

Or do you claim that bulldoze simply has another meaning here, namely, push, and that here again, there is nothing but literal meaning?
_____

What about this one?

The sales staff was exhausted at the end of that day. They had unexpectedly been flooded with a tsunami of requests from customers.

Second, literal meanings of flood and tsunami? Or implied metaphors?

As you see, there are many degrees of "metaphoricness" -- if that's a word. Emotion: smile

____________

I think you may have misparsed my post. The comment starting, "Again, as above, ..." applies to the example that follows, not to the immediately preceding example of implied metaphor. "as above" does not refer to the material immediately preceding but to a similar comment made even earlier about similes. I'll go back and draw a separator line there.
AvangiAre you saying, "You're a lantern" is a metaphor, and "You light up my life" is an implied metaphor?
Yes. Precisely. That's almost exactly what some of the source materials say that I found on the internet. I think the first link I gave has another link to some explanation like that. The idea, according to those who write up the strictest possible definitions of these things, is that the metaphor formula (cited at the top of this post) must be used for the word "metaphor" to apply (strictly), and that other, looser uses of metaphoric language must be called "implied metaphors". Pretty ridiculous, maybe, but that's what it said. Emotion: smile

CJ

Edit: I revised my previous post, reorganizing the order of presentation.
I looked up "shoot down", "bulldoze", "flood", and "tsunami", and for all but the last I found a definition that corresponded to what I would call an "implied metaphor", so if the criterion for "implied metaphor" is that the definition is not in the dictionary, only "tsunami" qualifies among the examples I gave. (I don't believe that this is the proper criterion, but that's another story.)
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