Hello,

Is there a difference in meaning between the following two sentences:

1. I just finished reading the newspaper.
2. I have just finished reading the newspaper.

Are all grammatically correct? I have a feeling that sentence 1 is not grammatically correct, though nowadays people don't mind.

Also, what's the technical term of the verb forms above? Let me take a guess: Sentence 2 is called present perfect.
New Member21
I think sentence 1 is wrong. The reason is that one should use present perfect for "just".
Sentence 1 would be simple past, if it were correct. Sentence 2 is present perfect.
BeanbagHello, Is there a difference in meaning between the following two sentences: 1. I just finished reading the newspaper. 2. I have just finished reading the newspaper. Are all grammatically correct? I have a feeling that sentence 1 is not grammatically correct, though nowadays people don't mind. Also, what's the technical term of the verb forms above? Let me take a guess: Sentence 2 is called present perfect.
Junior Member53
. I just finished reading the newspaper.
2. I have just finished reading the newspaper. There is nothing wrong with # 1. It's acceptable.

If I said " I just saw Mary walking by your office", is it wrong in your estimation?
Senior Member3,816
Goodman. I just finished reading the newspaper.
2. I have just finished reading the newspaper. There is nothing wrong with # 1. It's acceptable.


If I said " I just saw Mary walking by your office", is it wrong in your estimation?


OK. I am learning the present perfect sense, and the teacher told me, that I should use present perfect if I see "just".
I can say " I just saw Mary walking by your office". This implies it just happened short time ago and the past tense is understood with no time constrain.

I've seen Mary walking by your office this morning. This one has a time reference, however, it's not a defined one. "This morning could mean 8, 9 or even 10 o'clock. Therefore "I have seen" affectively covers the span of the entire morning since 8 am.

I just finished reading the newspaper.
2. I have just finished reading the newspaper. There is nothing wrong with # 1. It's acceptable.

The reason I said the sentence is acceptable is because “finished” is not an ongoing action. Pretend you just finished watching a movie 10 minutes ago, you can say ‘I’ve just finished watching a movie; with no mentioning of time, or simply say” I just finished watching a movie”. The p.p. tense formula is always true; only if it fits the context requirement. It really depends how long ago you have finished doing something. When it’s done, it’s finished. So p.p. or simple past tense in that context will be acceptable to me.
The use of "already" and "just" with the simple past is AmE. In formal BrE, they are used commonly with the present perfect tense. It's probable Daiaoaixiad learned BrE.

paco
Senior Member4,095
Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
Really ! Perhaps, Nona The Brit can shed some light on it. "Already" and "just" should be common words in English regardless AmE or BrE.
Goodman

Why did you twist my message every time? When and where did I say such a thing like "just" and "already" are uncommon in BrE? I said to Daxiao (not to you!) that the use of such adverbs with the simple past tense is one of the features of AmE.

[url=http://www.davidappleyard.com/english/tenses.htm ]ENGLISH TENSE[/url]
The present perfect is used with already, just and yet.
'Samantha has already left, but Cindy has just arrived, so I guess the party hasn't finished yet.'
Note that American English often uses the simple past tense with already, just and yet.
'Samantha already left, but Cindy just arrived, so I guess the party didn't finish yet.'


paco
Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
Anonymous:
Thanks for your clear explanation. it helped me a lot.
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