Furthermore, hiring managers expect this trend to continue for years to come.

1. for years to come = for (the) coming years? which is normally used?

2. for the coming years or for coming years, which is right or normal?

Thanks a lot.
Regular Member934
For the coming years.
New Member01
"...for years to come" is a very common expression. It means "for the next several years."
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But how about for the coming years? Such a phase should also mean for the years to come, right?
For years to come - this suggests a very long time to me.

For the coming years - this suggests only a few years to me.
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Nona The BritFor years to come - this suggests a very long time to me.

For the coming years - this suggests only a few years to me.
I agree.
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