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I'm confused with the functions of the infinitive as in many books the opinion differs. Which of the infinitive's functions is used in the following sentences.
I'm happy to hear it.
He's ready to go there.
I'm sorry to keep you waiting.
......

to be+adjective+to infinitive - Object or The part of a compound verbal predicate?
Junior Member78
You'll be confused forever if you try to complicate the simple grammar of English. I never heard the infinitive should have a special "function" after an adjective. Why should it? Simply remember that the infinitive is normally used after an adjective. There are exceptions, though. It is possible to say:

It was nice talking to you.

CB
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Nicely put and I agree!

You'll be confused forever if you try to complicate the simple grammar of English. I never heard the infinitive should have a special "function" after an adjective. Why should it? Simply remember that the infinitive is normally used after an adjective. There are exceptions, though. It is possible to say:
Senior Member3,816
OlgaaI'm happy to hear it.
He's ready to go there.
I'm sorry to keep you waiting.

to be+adjective+to infinitive - Object or The part of a compound verbal predicate?
I'm curious about what you mean by "object." Your three examples are obviously to be + adjective complement plus infinitive. Where can there be any room here for an object? - an object of what? The verb "to be" doesn't take an object. Object of the preposition? There are no prepositions. Am I missing something?

Examples of "object of the verb" would be:

I love to eat.
Don't forget to write.
Let's try to go faster.

You can often use the gerund form of the verb instead of the infinitive in these cases:

I love eating.
Don't forget writing.
Let's try going faster.

- A.

Edit. Aha! Just for the heckuvit, I Googled "compound verbal predicate." All the references are Chech, or "contemporary Romanian languages."

Obj. of prep: (I stole this) The girl wanted nothing except to succeed in the class. "Except" is a preposition; the infiniitive, "to succeed", is its object.
(Sorry, I just couldn't seem to think of one by myself at the moment.)
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Isn't it (The girl wanted nothing except to succeed in the class.) the adverbial modifier of exception?
OlgaaIsn't it (The girl wanted nothing except to succeed in the class.) the adverbial modifier of exception?
Ye gadz! I'll have to look that one up! - A.

Edit. Sorry, I misunderstood.

No, I don't think so.

Exactly which part of the sentence are you proposing as the adverbial modifier??
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except to succeed

Could you please provide some sites or other resources where all the functions of the infinitive are considered in detail?
Hi Olgaa,
"Except to succeed" can't modify itself.

"to succeed" is an infinitive. It functions as object of the preposition "except," which means it functions as a noun. ("Except" means about the same as "besides" here, but both these words have other uses.)

Since infinitives are "verbals" (derived from verbs; forms of verbs) they can take adverbial modifiers and objects.
"In the class" is a prepositional phrase which acts adverbially, as the modifier of the infinitive, "to succeed."
That's the only "adverbial modifier" in the sentence. (Remember that adverbs may also modify adjectives.)
I suppose you could say that objects of the verb "tell" something about the verb, but we don't call them "adverbial."

The prepositional phrase "except to succeed" functions adjectivally, modifying the noun "nothing."

"Nothing" is the direct object of the main verb, "wanted."
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I don't have a list of sources at hand. Perhaps someone else could help you with that.

I use Google when I want to check some specific thing, but I never know what's going to come up. It crossed my mind yesterday to try to find something for you, but I didn't get to it.

There are some interesting uses of the infinitive (sometimes "bare") beyond what we've discussed here. You might try Google on your own. These skills are certainly useful to develop.
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Anonymous:
The sentence "It was nice talking to you." doesn't use a infinitive. An infinitive is TO + VERB.

The main function of an infinitive is to express purpose..

Ex. I always bring a book to read whenever I'm bored.
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