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Anonymous:
A. I really enjoyed my work there especially the opportunity they gave me to develop my potentials to the point where I'm now ready for greater responsibilities.
B. I really enjoyed my work there especially the opportunity they have given me to develop my potentials to the point where I'm now ready for greater responsibilities.

C. She gave me the best guidance possible and the opportunity to develop my potentials to the point where I'm now ready for new challenges.

D. She has given me the best guidance possible and the opportunity to develop my potentials to the point where I'm now ready for new challenges.

1. Which in each pair is more appropriate or better when talking about a past job and a past supervisor for an interview?
2. Please explain why one is the answer and why not the other.
3. Would your answer in #1 change if I pluralize the word "opportunity" in the examples? I wonder if this would have a bearing because it would be that the opportunities given probably happened at different times in the past calling for the use of the present perfect.

4. I have listed some of my reflections on this based on my understanding of what I've read about the tenses in question. If you could, please comment on each one of them whether it's correct or not.

a. I'm actually more inclined to using the simple past "gave" because the giving of opportunity and guidance stopped when I left the company.
b. Using the present perfect might suggest that I'm still part of the company and part of my supervisor's team.

c. However, I think the present perfect "has/have given" is also possible because there was no mention of a specific past time in my sentences.
d. Or perhaps the present perfect is more appropriate because the giving of opportunity and guidance is treated as an experience I've had in the past with my past job and past supervisor.
e. Also, the present perfect could be more appropriate because the giving of opportunity and guidance has a connection to the present, ie. I'm now ready for greater and new challenges. I'm not sure about this, though, because still, the giving stopped when I resigned.
f. The present perfect could be used because the giving of opportunity and guidance which happened in the past continues to be true to the present time.

I'm sorry if this is very long and probably daunting, but I'd really like to learn this.
Thank you in advance for your patience and assistance.
Hi,
I assume you are not presently working there,

Note the spelling of 'potential'.

A. I really enjoyed my work there especially the opportunity they gave me to develop my potential to the point where I'm now ready for greater responsibilities.
B. I really enjoyed my work there especially the opportunity they have given me to develop my potentials to the point where I'm now ready for greater responsibilities.

C. She gave me the best guidance possible and the opportunity to develop my potentials to the point where I'm now ready for new challenges.
D. She has given me the best guidance possible and the opportunity to develop my potentials to the point where I'm now ready for new challenges.

1. Which in each pair is more appropriate or better when talking about a past job and a past supervisor for an interview?
2. Please explain why one is the answer and why not the other. B and D sound like you still work there.

3. Would your answer in #1 change if I pluralize the word "opportunity" in the examples? I wonder if this would have a bearing because it would be that the opportunities given probably happened at different times in the past calling for the use of the present perfect. No, that makes no diffeerence. Just uuse Simple Past.
eg In my job 10 years ago, they gave me lots of opportunities.
eg Last year, I cooked dinner lots of times.

4. I have listed some of my reflections on this based on my understanding of what I've read about the tenses in question. If you could, please comment on each one of them whether it's correct or not.

a. I'm actually more inclined to using the simple past "gave" because the giving of opportunity and guidance stopped when I left the company. Yes

b. Using the present perfect might suggest that I'm still part of the company and part of my supervisor's team. Yes

c. However, I think the present perfect "has/have given" is also possible because there was no mention of a specific past time in my sentences. No. The 'giving' has not continued up to the present time.

d. Or perhaps the present perfect is more appropriate because the giving of opportunity and guidance is treated as an experience I've had in the past with my past job and past supervisor.
This is a reason for using Simple Past.
e. Also, the present perfect could be more appropriate because the giving of opportunity and guidance has a connection to the present, ie. I'm now ready for greater and new challenges. I'm not sure about this, though, because still, the giving stopped when I resigned. Yes, that's the main point.

f. The present perfect could be used because the giving of opportunity and guidance which happened in the past continues to be true to the present time. The PP suggests the act of giving continued to the present.

Clive
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Anonymous:
Thank you very much for answering my questions one by one and for helping me understand this.

I see the answer is the simple past "gave" because the act of giving stopped when I left.

Just to further confirm my understanding, I'd just like to compare the following examples from other threads with the same scenario that I'm not presently working there. I wonder why the present perfect is correct in these cases.

My time at X company has shown me that I've developed my analytical skill.
Is it correct because the act of showing continues to the present, as well as the act of developing, even though I'm no longer part of the company?

I have improved the internal controls of the department.
Based on what I read, the present perfect can be used because the effect of the improvement may still be taking place or being experienced by the department even if I left the department some time ago. Also, one may want to connect the past to the present time even if the improvement is clearly finished and happened months or a year ago, not just recently. Would you agree? Or do you think the simple past "improved" is more correct because I'm no longer part of the department?

Just additional examples below:

eg. My last job has taught me to be flexible and adaptable to changes.
Can I use the present perfect here suggesting that the "teaching" continues to the present time, the same as the act of "showing" does in the previous example above? Again, it is no longer my job.

eg. My former teammates has told me that I have keen eyes for details.
Can I use the present perfect here suggesting that my former teammates continues to tell this, even though I'm no longer their teammate? Just my humble opinion, I think it's possible that former colleagues could say things about me in the past and continue to say them to the present time. Or do you think, only the simple past is correct because the "telling" happened in the past before I resigned?

Again, thank you very much for your patience and assistance.
Hi,
I see the answer is the simple past "gave" because the act of giving stopped when I left.

Just to further confirm my understanding, I'd just like to compare the following examples from other threads with the same scenario that I'm not presently working there. I wonder why the present perfect is correct in these cases.

My time at X company has shown me that I've developed my analytical skill.
Is it correct because the act of showing continues to the present, as well as the act of developing, even though I'm no longer part of the company? I wouldn't use Present Perfect here, because it still makes it sound like you are still working there. Can you see anything in this sentence that suggests you no longer work there? I can't.

I have improved the internal controls of the department.
Based on what I read, the present perfect can be used because the effect of the improvement may still be taking place or being experienced by the department even if I left the department some time ago. Also, one may want to connect the past to the present time even if the improvement is clearly finished and happened months or a year ago, not just recently. Would you agree? Or do you think the simple past "improved" is more correct because I'm no longer part of the department?

Yes, Simple Past.

Just additional examples below:

eg. My last job has taught me to be flexible and adaptable to changes.
Can I use the present perfect here suggesting that the "teaching" continues to the present time, the same as the act of "showing" does in the previous example above? Again, it is no longer my job.
PP is a bit moroe acceptable here, because 'my last job' makes it clear you no longer work there.

eg. My former teammates has have told me that I have a keen eye keen eyes for details.
Can I use the present perfect here suggesting that my former teammates continues to tell this, even though I'm no longer their teammate? Just my humble opinion, I think it's possible that former colleagues could say things about me in the past and continue to say them to the present time. Or do you think, only the simple past is correct because the "telling" happened in the past before I resigned? I think you are trying to say things in a needlessly complicated manner that require the listener to do too much interpretation. If you really want to convey the idea that they continue to say that to the present time , then say My former teammates tell me that . . . '.
But the fact that you continue to have conversations with your former team-mates seems to me a rather irrelevant thing to start to explain in an interview.

Clive
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Anonymous:
Thank you, again, Clive, for your answers. I really appreciate them.
CliveMy time at X company has shown me that I've developed my analytical skill.
Is it correct because the act of showing continues to the present, as well as the act of developing, even though I'm no longer part of the company? I wouldn't use Present Perfect here, because it still makes it sound like you are still working there. Can you see anything in this sentence that suggests you no longer work there? I can't.
I'm sorry, Clive, I'm still confused. I thought the present perfect was preferred for an interview because as much as possible, one should give more focus on the present instead of the past.
That was what I understood in the past from this thread. It even says A of the examples there is not wrong in a case where one has left the company. I hope you can enlighten me, please.

http://www.englishforums.com/English/InterviewPastTensePresent-Pefect/nxmrm/post.htm
CliveI have improved the internal controls of the department.
Based on what I read, the present perfect can be used because the effect of the improvement may still be taking place or being experienced by the department even if I left the department some time ago. Also, one may want to connect the past to the present time even if the improvement is clearly finished and happened months or a year ago, not just recently. Would you agree? Or do you think the simple past "improved" is more correct because I'm no longer part of the department?
Yes, Simple Past.
I also have this link where the present perfect can be used in this example given the scenario. I hope you can comment on this as well, please. I'd really love to hear different opinions on this.

http://www.englishforums.com/English/ComparingAnswersPostsSimplePast-PresentPerfect/nprzm/post.htm
CliveBut the fact that you continue to have conversations with your former team-mates seems to me a rather irrelevant thing to start to explain in an interview.
Does this mean it's better to just use the simple past "told", ie. My former team-mates told me that I have a keen eye for details.?
By the way, I see "keen eyes for details" was edited, is it because "a keen eye for details" is the normal expression? Or is it a fixed expression?

I've noticed that the correct choice for my examples were mostly the simple past. What about in the example below? Is the present perfect incorrect below if I'm currently unemployed and still looking for a job? Do you think the simple past is more correct because the act of working stopped when I resigned from my last job?

eg. I have worked for large multinational companies.

I'm sorry. I might be asking too many questions, but I hope you can help me understand this better. Thank you very much.
Hi,
Sorry, this is getting a bit too lengthy and time-consuming for me, and I don't really have anything to add to my previous scomments without repeating myself. I don't have time to go through a lot of other threads.

However, here are a few more brief remarks.

I thought the present perfect was preferred for an interview because as much as possible, one should give more focus on the present instead of the past.
Yes. That's why I'd use Simple Present a lot in an interview, instead of tying myself up in knots about whether I still work somewhere or not. The interviewer cares more about what you can do right now than what you did in the past.

Clive

But the f act that you continue to have conversations with your former team-mates seems to me a rather irrelevant thing to start to explain in an interview.
Does this mean it's better to just use the simple past "told", ie. My former team-mates told me that I have a keen eye for details.? Yes

By the way, I see "keen eyes for details" was edited, is it because "a keen eye for details" is the normal expression? Or is it a fixed expression? Yes, it's an idiom.

I've noticed that the correct choice for my examples were mostly the simple past. What about in the example below? Is the present perfect incorrect below if I'm currently unemployed and still looking for a job? Do you think the simple past is more correct because the act of working stopped when I resigned from my last job?

eg. I have worked for large multinational companies. This is OK. But I'd still consider talking about myself in the present, eg I have experience (right now !!!) with large multinational companies.

Clive
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Anonymous:
Hi Clive,

I'm very sorry for my being inquisitive. I just wanted to fully understand the difference, not only for an interview, but also for my future reference. Thank you for your answers in my last post. I really appreciate your taking time to help me. I hope you don't mind me asking one more question and your confirmation. I will try to make this as short as possible.

I
Cliveeg. I have worked for large multinational companies. This is OK. But I'd still consider talking about myself in the present, eg I have experience (right now !!!) with large multinational companies.
I understand we can simply say this in the present as you wrote above, but I'm just curious about the usage of the present perfect. I believe the PP is correct in the first three examples below. A and B talk about experience, whereas C can either be an experience or an accomplishment. By the way, I also read that the PP can be understood as actions or events listed in a person's life diary. In the same familiar example D, is it incorrect to treat the "making of improvement" as an experience/accomplishment in the person's life (with "now" as the reference), instead of just an experience/accomplishment during his tenure at the department, which is until resigning?

A. I have been to Paris.
B. I have seen the movie 'Notebook'.
C. I have built a house all by myself.
D. I have improved the internal controls of the department.
CliveMy time at X company has shown me that I've developed my analytical skill.
Is it correct because the act of showing continues to the present, as well as the act of developing, even though I'm no longer part of the company? I wouldn't use Present Perfect here, because it still makes it sound like you are still working there. Can you see anything in this sentence that suggests you no longer work there? I can't.
This is the same example in an old thread you helped me with. I would assume that the answer in this new thread supersedes the old one where it said the PP was not a wrong choice. Please confirm.

http://www.englishforums.com/English/InterviewPastTensePresent-Pefect/nxmrm/post.htm
Hi,
I'm very sorry for my being inquisitive. I just wanted to fully understand the difference, not only for an interview, but also for my future reference. Thank you for your answers in my last post. I really appreciate your taking time to help me. I hope you don't mind me asking one more question and your confirmation. I will try to make this as short as possible.

I
Clive
"eg. I have worked for large multinational companies. This is OK. But I'd still consider talking about myself in the present, eg I have experience (right now !!!) with large multinational companies. "
I understand we can simply say this in the present as you wrote above, but I'm just curious about the usage of the present perfect. I believe the PP is correct in the first three examples below. Yes A and B talk about experience, whereas C can either be an experience or an accomplishment. By the way, I also read that the PP can be understood as actions or events listed in a person's life diary. In the same familiar example D, is it incorrect to treat the "making of improvement" as an experience/accomplishment in the person's life (with "now" as the reference), instead of just an experience/accomplishment during his tenure at the department, which is until resigning?
A. I have been to Paris.
B. I have seen the movie 'Notebook'.
C. I have built a house all by myself.
D. I have improved the internal controls of the department.
If you want to speak of D as an accomplishment in your life to date, say
I have improved the internal controls of a department.
'The department' clouds the meaning. It makes the listener wonder 'Which specific department? Or has this person only ever dealt in his life with one department?' In other words, 'the department' works where your frame of reference is your time at XYZ company, but not where your frame of reference is your life to date.

Clive
My time at X company has shown me that I've developed my analytical skill.
Is it correct because the act of showing continues to the present, as well as the act of developing, even though I'm no longer part of the company? I wouldn't use Present Perfect here, because it still makes it sound like you are still working there. Can you see anything in this sentence that suggests you no longer work there? I can't.
"
I'm getting confused abot what was asked and what was replied when, but your underlined sentence above still seems to me rather confusing and even a bit convoluted if you use it in a context where you no longer work there.

This is the same example in an old thread you helped me with. I would assume that the answer in this new thread supersedes the old one where it said the PP was not a wrong choice. Please confirm.
http://www.englishforums.com/English/InterviewPastTensePresent-Pefect/nxmrm/post.htm

Clive
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Anonymous:
Hi Clive,
CliveIf you want to speak of D as an accomplishment in your life to date, say
I have improved the internal controls of a department.
'The department' clouds the meaning. It makes the listener wonder 'Which specific department? Or has this person only ever dealt in his life with one department?' In other words, 'the department' works where your frame of reference is your time at XYZ company, but not where your frame of reference is your life to date.
I can see now the difference with changing the article. Thank you for your explanation.
CliveI'm getting confused abot what was asked and what was replied when, but your underlined sentence above still seems to me rather confusing and even a bit convoluted if you use it in a context where you no longer work there.
I will stick, then, to the simple past "showed" to avoid confusion. However, is it OK to continue using "have developed" below to show that I still have the skill? This sentence was your original suggestion in the old thread I provided, in the same context where I no longer work there.
eg. My time at X company showed that I've developed my analytical skill.
http://www.englishforums.com/English/InterviewPastTensePresent-Pefect/nxmrm/post.htm

This is probably my last question. I'm sorry I know I've taken so much of your time. I really appreciate your answering my questions, though.
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