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There are so many anonymous posts lately! It's much more interesting for the volunteers to answer posts from people with names. Please register and pick a screen name, especially if you are going to ask several questions. Thank you! Click here to register
 
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have been have benn ~ing have pp help me out!
 
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Even though, Carol and I already told him frequently that the foods isn’t allowed to bring to class and he seem doesn’t following it.
 
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Hello, I have paraphrased a few sentences. I would appreciate if you corrected my sentences paying also attention to commas (I am not sure where they are necessary) Efficiently as we all work, they never praise us. Stop spreading gossip or else we’ll never talk to you again. Much as I respect Mrs Brown, I don’t always agree with her. We’ll walk with the torches turned off lest no one might see/sees /will see(?) us. We’ll walk with the torches turned off lest somebody might see/sees /will see(?) us. However hard Mark works, his employer never gives him any bonuses. Seeing that they are very obstinate, we we won't waste our time trying to convince them. No matter how incompetent she was, the boss never fired her. Much as I like having fun at the seaside, I haven't had any for ages. Courteous as Gloria is, she can also be very unkind Thank you!...
 
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Hope to have more success in the exhibition
 
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Regading "put out fire", which is correct? They put out fire / a fire / the fire.
 
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Can we "take" a job interview just like we take an exam or test as in "I took an interview for the job of a programmer" ? And, if I were the interviewer should I say "I gave an interview" or "I conducted an interview" ?
 
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He gave me a book.
 
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Hi, Are the following sentences natural to a native ear? 1. Can you please make a 45-minute appointment for me for tomorrow? (I said this to a receptionist). 2. Are you a take-out or a sit-down place? 3. It is one thing to say things in a feat of anger and it is another to actually do them. Thanks, MG.
 
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Which is correct? any question or any questions.
 
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hi teachers, What doesn't Fred know? He doesn't know that his wife came into the pub only a few seconds ago and is standing behind him. The 'that' in the answer is fine to me, if I'm not mistaken, but is the question correct too, or is there a better oner? Thanks in advance
 
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Hi. Which is correct? There are fifteen members in this group, including Ms. Jane Doe, who/whom I think is the best piano player among them. I think it would be easy to figure out which to use if the phrase "I think" weren't in the sentence (like this). There are fifteen members in this group, including Ms. Jane Doe, who is the best piano player among them.
 
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StartFragment> In a test, there was a question like the below. The answer is (d), and I agree with that. But I am not 100 agree with the rule of the answer. It said the rule is "It was agreed that... (should) root of verb." So the answer should be (d) 31. It was agreed that the company _______________ its prices. (a) be not raise (b) not raises (c) raise not (d) not raise Please check out the below website. [link] We can see "It was agreed that" structure, and half of them have past tenses. Help me and let me out of this tricky problem.
 
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Hi. Which is correct? What is the best brand of shoulder bag/shoulder bags ? How about this? What is the best brand of sedan/sedans ? I think this is correct? What is the best brand of salt ?
 
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i wonder what the pattern of the following sentence is. 'It seems like it is going to rain.' can anybody help me with it? please. thank you.
 
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Please remind your transporter to deliver the goods on-time on 22:00 tomorrow and must finish goods consolidate before 24:00. We will charge you USDxx for this special arrangement. We will claim your responsibility for the whole container goods if your customs document have problem and cannot deliver goods tomorrow
 
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please check the sentence Hello Mr.name. As per my schedule I have completed my work today so I can go to my home town this week. What to say? Thanks
 
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Hi teachers, I'm going to 'get' very wet if that bus doesn't come soon. Can you tell me one or more synoyms for the verb 'get' in this context? I've tried to find one, but none seem to be the right one to me. Thanks in advance
 
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Hi, Tottenham boss Harry Redknapp said: "Two years ago if you would have said that we would have made it to the quarter-finals of the Champions League, I would have thought you were crazy." And my question is: is it possible to use would + perfect infinitive in a subordinate clause introduced by if expressing condition? Thank you....
 
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Dear Teachers “I don’t like this kind of sentence.” When we use a kind of something or more kinds of something, for example: a kind of sentence or two kinds of food and so on. Is the usage of a kind of same as a cup of, a set of, a kilogram of ...and so on? And" kind of " same as the above unit quantities nouns in order to be used to modify the following nouns (like the word “sentence”)? “ The Kind of “is an adjective phrase, Right? Thanks a lot.
 
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Hi all According to some grammars, can is rather used to express situations and events that are possible theoretically o for rgeneral possibility (i..e.: some gases can freeze under certain conditions) but not about the chances that something will actually happen or is actually true at the moment, where we'd use may, might or could. These grammars usually say that may is used to express occurences, things that happen in certain situations, and is especially used in scientific contexts as: -- Women may suffer from depression after the birth -- These flowers may have five os six petals, depending on the species My question is: given these two definitions of usage, which seem quite similar to me. Could we use either can or may in any of the sentences I've used as examples before (gases, women, flowers)? Thanks in advance
 
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Hello, In the sentence "Nearly everybody went to the party". what the word "Nearly" is? an adverb or adjective? In the Oxford dioctionary its wrtitten Adverb. But iam confused bcoz, here the word 'Nearly' modifies a pronoun 'everybody'. So how can it be an adverb? adverbs cant modify a pronoun, only the adjectives do so.
 
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Hi. Please advise if "Come again" can be used to mean "Say that again".
 
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Your talks are 'rarely comprehensible .' Does the above mean that the talks are hard to understand?
 
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Hello, Could you please tell me which is gramatically right: "Stronger" or "more strong"? Thanks
 
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The normal word order looks the following: Adverb + subject + adverb+ verb + object + adverb What if I write the following: On Monday he always has bread with honey for breakfast. Adverb of time: on Monday Subject: he Adverb of frequency: always Verb: has Object (direct): bread with honey Now my question is: Is "for breakfast" an adverb. If yes, what kind of adverb? If it's not an adverb, what is it then?
 
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