2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 » 7823
194
replies
There are so many anonymous posts lately! It's much more interesting for the volunteers to answer posts from people with names. Please register and pick a screen name, especially if you are going to ask several questions. Thank you! Click here to register
 
0
replies
Hi. I have a problem of using should, would and could. please help how to use them in a sentence Stella
By Anonymous  
 
1
replies
Which is correct? "After some time, the amount of water droplets became lesser" or "Afetr some time, the number of water droplets became lesser."
 
3
replies
What do you call the one that this photo shows?
 
1
replies
Is this sentence correct? "of what" is ok here? We want to write a list of what we need to pack.
 
1
replies
hello, could anyone tell me What kind of complement is indicated by the bolded word? That novel became an overnight bestseller .
 
0
replies
This book I must have for my report. What is the simple subject? 1. book 2. my 3. I 4. report
By Anonymous  
 
0
replies
Identify the one illogical comparison among the following examples. 1. Our art teacher has won more awards than any of our teachers. 2. We prefer art class over our other elective classes. 3. I prefer painting on wood to any other art medium. 4. Ms. Rios, my art teacher, is more strict than any of my other teachers.
By Anonymous  
 
2
replies
Recent missions in the moon's orbit have revealed evidence of water and other interesting substances on the moon, explained Jason Crusan, director of NASA's advanced exploration systems. "But to understand the extent and accessibility of these resources, we need to reach the surface and explore up close ." Source: "NASA bets on private companies to exploit moon's resources", AFP. Could you explain the meaning and grammar of "explore up close" here? I think it means "to look closely". BTW, how would you parse the phrase? explore: verb up: adverb close: adverb Is this right? Thanks....
By SquareSquare  
 
2
replies
Attached is a copy of a letter from CYZ requesting a copy of the report for the property that you handle. Thanks
 
2
replies
These partnerships work "very well in lower orbit," said Bigelow's Michael Gold, referring to the re-supply contracts at the International Space Station. "There is no reason it won't work just as well on the moon," he told AFP. Source: "NASA bets on private companies to exploit moon's resources", AFP. I am confused about the phrase "just as well". I think "just as" is an adverb here which means "equally well". However, I couldn't find any definition like that in dictionaries. Thanks.
By SquareSquare  
 
7
replies
Hi, experts! "The best you can do is make a decision..." Should it be "make" or "to make" here? I once read somewhere it's fine either way. This is what I just found and it's only "choose" here. “Welcome to the human race. Nobody controls his own life, Ender. The best you can do is choose to be controlled by good people, by people who love you.” ―Orson Scott Card
 
2
replies
-When a children is naughty, his parents would nip/turn/pick or ___? his ear. My friend gave me this sentence, but I just don't know what word we can use to depict that particular key-turning like act on the part of parents. Could you help me? Thank you.
 
1
replies
what's the difference between politeness past and now?
 
1
replies
AFTER THE GRILL IS HOT, add the steaks. what is the clause of the upper-cased words?
 
6
replies
Does during the course mean in the middle of something?and are these examples right! "He left us during the course of drinking"OR he left us halfway through the drinking? And can you please give me more examples of during the course? Thank you
 
2
replies
Did I say it correctly? "I don't drop music class for one day" "You should come to class without dropping a day" Can you also say it differently?
 
2
replies
Did she plucked the coconut? Had she plucked the coconut? Please write the difference between the two
 
3
replies
Does "although it might actually have been" mean "although it (the "a") might actually have been said"? Context: The broadcast did not have the "a" before "man", rendering the phrase a tautology (as man in such use is synonymous with mankind ). NASA and Armstrong insisted for years that static had obscured the "a", with Armstrong stating he would never make such a mistake, but after repeated listenings to recordings, Armstrong admitted he must have dropped the "a". [79] Armstrong later said he "would hope that history would grant me leeway for dropping the syllable and understand that it was certainly intended, even if it was not said— although it might actually have been ". [81] ...
 
2
replies
If a dressa does not fit my size,can I say "the dress falls short to me". Thank you.
 
1
replies
Hi. Please tell me which is correct. I think both are correct, although no. 1 makes it clear that the indicated achievement is for individual groups with a student belonging to a group, not multiple groups. I hope I've written what I wanted to say clearly (not sure, though). Anyway, thank you in advance for your help. It focuses on students' academic achievement within (1) their assigned group / (2) their assigned groups in various disciplines.
 
1
replies
Bryan had terrible mood swings and nightmares where/when he would wake up screaming. Can either word be used? Thanks.
 
1
replies
She asked, "Who was that fantastic man?" In reported speech, which is the correct answer? She asked who that fantastic man was. She asked who that fantastic man had been. Thanks.
 
1
replies
Does "some of what we've created" mean " some results of what we've created"? Context: Each week, we will post a question from NEJM Knowledge+ to help Journal readers test their understanding and see some of what we've created. There's more information available at the program website, knowledgeplus.NEJM.org. We know that for busy practitioners, time is the most precious commodity. The NEJM Knowledge+ learning system is designed to help clinicians identify what they really know and what they don't know and then to help fill in the gaps efficiently and effectively. We think this program will benefit physicians as a community of lifelong learners — and will ultimately benefit the patients who rely on us to make the right decision every time. MOre: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe1401777?query=featured_home...
 
0
replies
What does "I'll be missing you" mean? Does it mean the same thing as "I'll miss you"?
By HUBLOT  
 
3
replies
Hi I was wondering if anyone out there could tell me which is correct. Mrs Jones requests the pleasure of the company of...... Or, Mrs Jones request the pleasure of the company of.... Trying to finalise the wedding invitaions, and can't decide which one is correct. Thanks!...
 
 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 » 7823